New Zealand mosque shooter changes plea to guilty

Updated March 27, 2020

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Brenton Tarrant, the man charged in relation to the Christchurch massacre appear in the dock charged with murder in the Christchurch District Court on March 16, 2019. — AFP/File
Brenton Tarrant, the man charged in relation to the Christchurch massacre appear in the dock charged with murder in the Christchurch District Court on March 16, 2019. — AFP/File

WELLINGTON: An Australian far-right extremist charged with murdering 51 Muslim worshippers in last year’s mass shooting at two New Zealand mosques unexpectedly flipped his plea to guilty on Thursday.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and the Muslim community expressed relief at the surprise decision, which removes the need for a lengthy trial that authorities feared would be used to spout neo-Nazi propaganda.

Self-avowed white supremacist Brenton Tarrant, 29, had previously denied 51 charges of murder, 40 of attempted murder and one of terrorism but reversed his plea in a hurriedly arranged court hearing.

“Yes, guilty,” Tarrant told Christchurch High Court via videolink from Auckland Prison as the charges were read out to him.

Tarrant, wearing a grey top, stared intently at the camera while making his confession.

Neither the former gym instructor from the Australian country town of Grafton nor his lawyers offered any explanation for the change, which makes him New Zealand’s first-ever convicted terrorist.

The South Pacific nation does not have the death penalty but Tarrant faces the prospect of spending the rest of his life behind bars. The terror and murder charges all carry life sentences, setting a minimum non-parole period of 17 years but giving the judge power to imprison without the possibility of release.

Prime Minister Ardern said the admission of guilt would provide some relief to the many people whose lives were shattered in the attack.

“These guilty pleas and conviction bring accountability for what happened and also save the families who lost loved ones, those who were injured, and other witnesses, the ordeal of a trial,” she said.

Asked how she reacted upon hearing the news, Ardern replied: “I let out a huge sigh of relief.”

Judge Cameron Mander recorded convictions on all charges and said Tarrant would be sentenced at a date yet to be determined. “The guilty pleas represent a very significant step towards bringing finality to this criminal proceeding,” he said.

The plea came with New Zealand in its first day of a four-week Covid-19 lockdown. Mander said sentencing would take place “at a time when victims and their families can attend the court in person”.

Published in Dawn, March 27th, 2020