Farewell to Bulgarian and Australian envoys

Dean of the Diplomatic Corps Turkmen Ambassador Molamov Atajan with outgoing envoys, Roumen Pirontchev and Margaret Adamson, and other diplomats at the farewell event in Islamabad.
Dean of the Diplomatic Corps Turkmen Ambassador Molamov Atajan with outgoing envoys, Roumen Pirontchev and Margaret Adamson, and other diplomats at the farewell event in Islamabad.

Turkmenistan’s ambassador Movlamov Atajan hosted a formal farewell for two outgoing envoys last week, Ambassador Roumen Pirontchev of Bulgaria and his wife Anita Peroncho, and Australian High Commissioner Margaret Adamson, whose husband Marek Krol could not attend as he was abroad.

Ambassador Pirontchev has served in Pakistan more than 10 years, including his term as charge d’affairs, interrupted by a stint at home in Sofia, only to return to Islamabad as a full ambassador. He is now returning home awaiting his country’s decision about further posting abroad or serving at headquarters.

He said his work duties had been varied; from explaining where Bulgaria is on the map, namely neighbouring Turkey and Greece, to cooperating with Pakistan on the challenges of terrorism, which were high on the agenda during President Gen Musharraf’s time.

In addition to bilateral issues, he also drew attention to cooperation with Pakistan in the United Nations. He said he leaves Pakistan with mixed feelings, but indeed with many good memories.

High Commissioner Adamson gave an elaborate speech, focusing on a number of issues in the broad relations between Australia and Pakistan, with focus on trade, education, vocational training, and professional cooperation.

She mentioned issues of importance to both countries, such as water management and climate change issues, gender equality, agricultural development, and Pakistan’s export of top quality mangos.

Having served abroad for seven consecutive years, including four years in Pakistan, Ms Adamson said she would now move into the family home in Canberra, but didn’t know if she would be stay at home for some time or again be posted to another country.

In any case, she said she had accumulated several months of leave, so the next months would be a long vacation time. She stressed that she and her husband had certainly enjoyed their time in Pakistan, with memories from sheep shearing in Balochistan and mango farm visits in South Punjab to mountain viewing and more in the northern areas.

Kazakh ambassador hosts Iftar

Kazakh Ambassador Balybay Sadykov with some of the guests at an Iftar dinner he hosted at his residence in Islamabad.
Kazakh Ambassador Balybay Sadykov with some of the guests at an Iftar dinner he hosted at his residence in Islamabad.

Kazakh Ambassador Balybay Sadykov held a large Iftar dinner towards the end of Ramazan. Among the guests were ambassadors from Central Asian countries and other envoys and dignitaries from all walks of life.

Ambassador Murad Ashraf Janjua, the chief of protocol at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, was among the guests, as was retired secretary of defence Lt Gen Talat Masood.

“Since most envoys hold their Iftar dinners at hotels, that Ambassador Sadykov held it at his residence made it different and particularly pleasant,” said a guest.

“The house was spacious enough,” commented another guest, adding that Kazakhstan is an oil-rich country and Kazakhstan’s economy counts for some 60pc of Central Asia’s GDP.

“Besides, it is the world’s ninth largest country, and it has good relations with Pakistan,” added another guest as the conversation continued after dinner.

Published in Dawn, June 3rd, 2019

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