Model Town probe report: Govt ‘in no hurry’ to take action

Updated 09 Nov 2014

Email

Supporters of preacher Tahir-ul-Qadri perform funeral prayers over coffins of fellow supporters killed during clashes with police in Lahore on late June 17, 2014 - AFP/File
Supporters of preacher Tahir-ul-Qadri perform funeral prayers over coffins of fellow supporters killed during clashes with police in Lahore on late June 17, 2014 - AFP/File

LAHORE: The judicial commission report on the June 17 Model Town incident is still on the back burner and the government seems to be in no hurry to take any action in the light of its recommendations, or to make it public.

The inquiry conducted by Justice Ali Baqar Najfi of the Lahore High Court had reportedly held the government responsible for the incident, saying police acted on its orders that led to bloodshed.

At least 11 activists of the Pakistan Awami Tehreek were killed and many others injured during a clash with police on June 17 last. The commission constituted on the request of the Punjab government had handed over its report to the provincial government on Aug 9.

The government kept the report secret but its contents were leaked to the media afterwards.

The government declared the report inconclusive and constituted a committee to carry out its detailed analysis, and make recommendations.

It also requested the Lahore High Court to provide some missing documents which it declared were necessary for taking action against anyone found responsible for the killing.

Official sources informed Dawn on Saturday that the committee headed by retired Justice Khalilur Rehman had not as yet furnished its report. The LHC had also not given the demanded missing documents that could support the judicial commission’s recommendations.

“No action can be taken without the missing documents and the detailed analysis of the commission’s report,” an official said.

He did not give any time frame for finalisation of the process initiated by the government.

He said findings of all judicial commissions reports were not binding on the government. And in the case of the Model Town incident inquiry, there were no findings. Giving findings and fixing responsibility was the job of the government which it would do only after examining the supporting affidavits and other documents being sought from the commission, he said.

Published in Dawn, November 9th, 2014