03 September, 2014 / Ziqa'ad 7, 1435

India launches satellite for new navigation system

Published Jul 02, 2013 02:14pm
In this Monday July 1, 2013, photo, Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C22) carrying dedicated navigation satellite, IRNSS-1A lifts off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh state, India. —AP Photo
In this Monday July 1, 2013, photo, Indian Space Research Organization’s (ISRO) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C22) carrying dedicated navigation satellite, IRNSS-1A lifts off from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh state, India. —AP Photo

BANGALORE: India launched the first of seven satellites for its domestic satellite navigation network Tuesday, its space centre said, in the first step to creating a scaled down version of the US Global Positioning System.

A rocket took off in the early hours from a site in the southeastern state of Andhra Pradesh and injected the 600-kilogramme satellite into orbit 20 minutes later.

Once fully operational in 2015, the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) will provide accurate positioning services for civilian and military users across India and up to 1,500 kilometres beyond its borders.

“The remaining six navigational satellites will be launched at every six months over the next 30-36 months,” Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman K Radhakrishnan said after the launch.

The United States’ GPS is the most widely used network by consumers with 24 satellites, but other countries including Russia, the European Union and most recently China have developed rival positioning systems.

China’s Beidou, or Compass, navigation system started providing services in the region in December, and is expected to offer global coverage by 2020.

Beijing began building the network in 2000 to avoid relying on the US GPS system. According to reports, Pakistan is set to become the fifth Asian country to use the Chinese system.

The IRNSS will provide commercial and public navigational services such as helping with disaster management as well as movements of India's military, including those of ships and aircraft.

Indian officials estimate the project will cost 14.2 billion rupees ($238.6 million).

India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition.


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Comments (32) (Closed)


aman
Jul 02, 2013 02:23pm

good luck India

amit
Jul 02, 2013 03:02pm

"India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition'. This statement was unnecessary, Indian economy is much more than that. Investiment of 1420 crores for the navigation systyem can be easily afforded by Indian government for startegic, military and civil needs of the country, hence no qualms for that.

Mohan
Jul 02, 2013 03:27pm

Well, India's space program is hailed only one among all the comity of nations which is social development oriented. And the return on investment is highest among even when compared with developed nations. Conversely, the space program budget is so small in India and if one budget of space program could have wiped off generations of poverty, then India could have very well done it. For an allroud development of a country or actually, phenomenal development of current India contributon of space tech is huge and any criticism is very myopic and criticising for the sake of criticising will not do any good.

Indian
Jul 02, 2013 03:26pm

The last two lines has indicated me that I am on Pak news portal....any how good progress India well done....

Hafeez
Jul 02, 2013 03:34pm

At the bottom of this article it is written that there are criticizes for $2.3billion project, as India still faces poverty and malnutrition problems.. I wonder why critics does not understand the logic that If India has to concentrate on poor totally by neglecting educated youth and Talent in entire country.. If educated youth were not given job or country doesnot enter into 21st technology world then poverty eradication is never possible. According to my point of view India should cut short its military expenses and put more efforts on space technology..India has achieved many records on space research. I appreciate their effort.. During late 50's pakistan's team of graduates were sent to NASA to study space technology as soon as they returned they were asked to work on Rockets(missiles) which could carry nuclear weapons. Unlike Indian scientists who returned from Russian space research started their mission to establish space technology for nation. Even though I am not a citizen of India Iam proud that my father and fore father belonged to that sacred land.. all the best ISRO keep going.

Hafeez
Jul 02, 2013 03:35pm

In late 50's Group of graduates were sent to NASA to study space research. as soon as they returned they were asked to design missiles which could carry nuclear weapons unlike Indian scientists who returned from Russian space center started their own organisation to develop space research in the county.

nik
Jul 02, 2013 03:40pm

lol!! no wonder every time i read a article on dawn regarding India space program it always end up with poverty,u won't see this while china launches a man mission despite there are more poor people in china than whole population of Pakistan, while Pakistan continue to be in top ten failed state with poverty increasing day by day & India despite facing huge challenges continues to do work to eradicate poverty, human development index of india is better than pakistan

Reji
Jul 02, 2013 03:56pm

The budget of the Indian Space program is minuscule compared to the amount of money the government wastes away in mismanaged and ill conceived projects. The cleaning of the Yamuna river in India is a classic case where the government has wasted away around 2000 crores on cleaning up the river, nevertheless the river today is nothing more than a drain. Distribution of Free TV's and Laptop and the sort does not mean much to the nation which lacks toilets and clean water. Nevertheless the resources on ISRO are well spent unlike the DRDO.

Nish
Jul 02, 2013 03:56pm

India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition. Who is criticizing part from Pakistan?

Sidd
Jul 02, 2013 04:30pm

Pak don't have a "well-established space programme" . So I believe your govt has successfully encountered poverty and child malnutrition . Hw sick a simple news reporting can be one has to learn from u guys.....

Sidd
Jul 02, 2013 04:28pm

Pak don't have a "well-established space programme" . So I believe your govt has successfully encountered poverty and child malnutrition . Hw sick a simple news reporting can be one has to learn from u guys.....

Tamilselvan
Jul 02, 2013 04:42pm

India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition. Well, Pakistan has no space program but has it solved poverty and malnutrition? No. India is using the technology to give input in farming and for communication to education in rural areas etc. Technology and development go hand in hand. Wish relations are better between these countries and Pakistan could benefit from technically advanced India

Md Tariq
Jul 02, 2013 04:59pm

let the crticiser has do their own job country has to grow is every aspect. Hey we don't mind to loose small thing for big gain

Ajay Vikram Singh
Jul 02, 2013 05:16pm

Pakistan can rent GPS and other services from india now.

sonu
Jul 02, 2013 05:51pm

congratulates india ,great mission.

sonu
Jul 02, 2013 05:52pm

great

Mohd Azim
Jul 02, 2013 06:03pm

How come Indians have gone so far of us. We are really bad now.

sid
Jul 02, 2013 06:24pm

ISRO is profit earning organisation,,,,,,,,,,,,All critics of space program are in fact jealous,,,,,,,,there is no link between space program and proverty,

Amit
Jul 02, 2013 07:11pm

'India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition.'

I dont understand why every time Dawn have to publish news in negative perspective when it comes to something with India and its development or achievement???? If Indian readers stop reading your web site it will be in the dustbin one day!

Tony
Jul 02, 2013 07:18pm

"India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition." LOL....

The AFP reporter must be a British, as she/he could not resist his/her usual well-known temptation of some-how mentioning 'poverty & malnutrition' in every report about India's technological & infrastructural development.

So Mr/Mrs Reporter, please enlighten us where from this "criticism" has come? Not a single Indian soul has criticized the Indian space program. But the world now knows that it has become a fashion for you to mention something about "poverty & malnutrition" every time you write such a report about India. This so called "criticism" is nothing but a figment of your biased imagination.

We Indians feel pity for you and just ignore you and will continue in our steely resolve to march ahead in technology & infrastructure development.

Tony
Jul 02, 2013 07:20pm

Correction - The satellite is not "600 kg" as mentioned in this report. The correct weight of the satellite is 1380 kg.

The AFP reporter should have shown some professional due diligence before writing this scientific news report. Instead he/she has wasted space in writing about some imaginary trash like "poverty & malnutrition".

chappan
Jul 02, 2013 07:32pm

congrats india

Dr. P.k. Ghosh
Jul 02, 2013 07:43pm

Please be honest the weight of this satellite was 1.500 KG approximately. See World Space Launches for data on this.

Shreekant
Jul 02, 2013 07:45pm

Yes we may be facing the challenges of malnutrition but that doesn't mean any govt should over look its technological and infrastructural requirements, Urbanization in India is happening at very fast pace

Infrastructure and urbanization growth calls for such ambitious projects to cope up with upcoming challenges

Well done India!!!

Civi varghese
Jul 02, 2013 07:54pm

well done India;go forward with technologies.Congratulations to scientists behind it

Tamilselvan
Jul 02, 2013 10:10pm

@Sidd: India has a well-established space programme, but its cost has attracted criticism as the government struggles to tackle poverty and child malnutrition. Well, Pakistan has no space program but has it solved poverty and malnutrition? No. India is using the technology to give input in farming and for communication to education in rural areas etc. Technology and development go hand in hand. Wish relations are better between these countries and Pakistan could benefit from technically advanced India

Patnaik
Jul 02, 2013 11:25pm

I love it that Dawn always closes out its report on a positive achievement in space by India by pointing out something negative - and in case of space program news articles I have noticed it always ends with malnutrition and poverty.

Raj
Jul 02, 2013 11:31pm

Guys, this is AFP new reporting, so please don't criticize Paki people for this report.

Bhujang Patil
Jul 03, 2013 04:10am

Attracted criticism from whom? Let me guess... It came from the experts who cannot fathom the positive effect of India's space program on education, agriculture, fishery, weather dependent services, and many other sectors.

Rameez
Jul 03, 2013 04:39am

The satellite weight is 1425 kg not 600 kg as reported in the article

Vishwa
Jul 03, 2013 07:35am

India has enough money to run space program as well as to handle poverty. We donate billions of dollars to Afghanistan, Nepan and many other needy countries. We also acquire European companies by spending billions. Obviously enough money is there. It is the question of running the poverty programs with effectiveness.

Moreover, you can't wait for everyone to become rich before starting the scientific work (like, Space program). These have to go in parallel.

Nikus
Jul 03, 2013 02:31pm

@Ajay Vikram Singh: Oye, They will use Baeidu from China