Wajid Zia says letter from Qatari royal seems to be part of a 'fictional myth'

Published October 18, 2018
Panamagate joint investigation team (JIT) head Wajid Zia. — File
Panamagate joint investigation team (JIT) head Wajid Zia. — File

The Panamagate joint investigation team (JIT) head and the National Accountability Bureau's (NAB) key witness in the Flagship Investment reference, Wajid Zia, on Thursday claimed that "we [the JIT] believed the letter from Qatari royal Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jaber Al-Thani seemed to be a fictional myth than fact".

While recording his statement in court, Zia said that the Qatari prince tried to use delaying tactics when the JIT asked him to record a formal statement about his letter.

"Later, he asked for assurances that he would not be produced in any Pakistani court," Zia added. He also told the court that the Qatari royal had initially even refused to record a statement at all.

Explaining how he came to the conclusion that the Qatari letter and the documents of transaction with the Qatari prince were fake, Zia said that Hussain Nawaz had told the JIT that he had showed the documents of the settlement with the Qataris to his brother, Hassan Nawaz.

"Hassan Nawaz, on the other hand, denied ever seeing these documents," Zia said in his statement.

"The JIT came to the conclusion that these documents were fake, and were created to fill a gap in the money trail," he added.

Objecting to this, Sharifs' lawyer Khawaja Haris said that Wajid Zia's personal opinion was not acceptable testimony.

Concluding his statement in court, Zia said that Hassan Nawaz had failed to explain the means through which Flagship Investment and other companies were formed.

"Hassan Nawaz provided funds from unidentified sources in the form of loans to these companies," Zia added.

He told the court that the JIT had taken a look at the financial statements of the companies formed under Flagship Investment and all of these financial details of the properties are to be found in Volume 7 of the JIT report.

According to the charge-sheet against the former premier, Sharif had told the JIT that he was a shareholder in 15 companies, including Flagship Invest­ments, Hartstone Properties, Que Holdings, Quint Eaton Place 2, Quint Saloane, Quaint, Flagship Securities, Quint Gloucester Place, Quint Paddington, Flagship Developments, Alanna Services (BVI), Lankin SA (BVI), Chadron, Ansbacher, Coomber and Capital FZE, Dubai.

Sharif was indicted in the corruption case last year.

Opinion

Editorial

The Musharraf enigma
Updated 06 Feb, 2023

The Musharraf enigma

The Musharraf era holds numerous lessons for Pakistan’s ruling elite, civilian and military.
Staying neutral
06 Feb, 2023

Staying neutral

THE Election Commission of Pakistan has what is perhaps one of the most thankless jobs in the country. The countless...
Wikipedia ban
06 Feb, 2023

Wikipedia ban

THE country was back in a familiar, dark place last week when the PTA blocked Wikipedia over the charge that it...
IMF’s firm stance
Updated 05 Feb, 2023

IMF’s firm stance

Pakistan needs to complete the review to stave off a default as well as to unlock inflows from other multilateral and bilateral lenders.
Grotesque bigotry
05 Feb, 2023

Grotesque bigotry

FREEDOM to profess one’s faith is guaranteed by the Constitution of Pakistan. However, for the country’s Ahmadi...
Kashmir reflections
05 Feb, 2023

Kashmir reflections

ASIDE from Kashmir Day, which the nation is observing today as an official holiday, there are a number of other days...