The Rani Mahal at Qila Rohtas in Jhelum. – Photo by Ema Anis

Qila Rohtas – legacy of the subcontinent’s ‘Lion King’

Qila Rohtas, which lies near the city of Jhelum, was built on the orders of Sher Shah Suri in the 16th century.
Updated 10 Apr, 2015 11:29am
Terrace near the Mori or Kashmiri Gate. The fort has 12 gates in total. – Photo by Ema Anis
Terrace near the Mori or Kashmiri Gate. The fort has 12 gates in total. – Photo by Ema Anis

Among the list of legacies left behind by Sher Shah Suri – the 'Lion King' of the subcontinent – is the Qila Rohtas, which lies upon a low rocky hill on the Grand Trunk (GT) Road near the city of Jhelum in Punjab.

It was built in the 16th century on Sher Shah's orders by Raja Todar Mal in order to suppress the tribes of the region and also to check Humayun’s entry into India.

Portion of the wall surrounding the fort. – Photo by Ema Anis
Portion of the wall surrounding the fort. – Photo by Ema Anis
A view of the Langar Khani gate. The fort has 12 gates. – Photo by Ema Anis
A view of the Langar Khani gate. The fort has 12 gates. – Photo by Ema Anis

The foundation of GT road which connects several cities of Punjab and extends to India, Afghanistan and Bangladesh was also laid down by Sher Shah Suri.

A merlon on a terrace inside the fort. – Photo by Ema Anis
A merlon on a terrace inside the fort. – Photo by Ema Anis
The Rani Mahal. – Photo by Ema Anis
The Rani Mahal. – Photo by Ema Anis
Raja Maan Singh's Haveli. – Photo by Ema Anis
Raja Maan Singh's Haveli. – Photo by Ema Anis

The fort also houses the residence of Raja Maan Singh, the most trusted general of Mughal emperor Akbar who stayed here briefly after Sher Shah's death. Maan Singh's haveli was built on the highest point of the fortress.

A view of the surrounding wall of the fort. – Photo by Ema Anis
A view of the surrounding wall of the fort. – Photo by Ema Anis
Near the Shah Wali Gate. – Photo by Ema Anis
Near the Shah Wali Gate. – Photo by Ema Anis
Inside the Shah Wali Gate. – Photo by Ema Anis
Inside the Shah Wali Gate. – Photo by Ema Anis
Wall near the Shah Wali Gate. – Photo by Ema Anis
Wall near the Shah Wali Gate. – Photo by Ema Anis