Creating unity

Pakistan's sectarian crisis has grown so acute that it is creeping into the country's contemporary art scene, spurring young artists to question the causes and assumptions behind the violent Sunni-Shia divide. While Pakistani artists have traditionally focused on tumultuous political and social changes, with their work even thriving on them, they are now also engaged in self-examination, say art professors and gallery workers.

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Saud Baloach, 28, a fine art artist, shows his incomplete statue "The Burden" during an interview with Reuters at Government College University in Lahore.
Saud Baloach, 28, a fine art artist, shows his incomplete statue "The Burden" during an interview with Reuters at Government College University in Lahore.
Imran Mudassar, 31, a fine art teacher, stands at the National College of Arts during an interview with Reuters in Lahore.
Imran Mudassar, 31, a fine art teacher, stands at the National College of Arts during an interview with Reuters in Lahore.
Saud Baloach, 28, a fine art artist, stands near his sculpture called "No Fear" during an interview with Reuters at Government College University.
Saud Baloach, 28, a fine art artist, stands near his sculpture called "No Fear" during an interview with Reuters at Government College University.
Visitors look at a latex russet-coloured sack designed to feel like human skin, at an exhibition.
Visitors look at a latex russet-coloured sack designed to feel like human skin, at an exhibition.
Schezre Syed, 23, a graduate student from the National College of Arts (NCA), gestures beside her work during an interview with Reuters at National Art Gallery.
Schezre Syed, 23, a graduate student from the National College of Arts (NCA), gestures beside her work during an interview with Reuters at National Art Gallery.
Man walking past a series of painting at Government College University in Lahore.
Man walking past a series of painting at Government College University in Lahore.

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