The date marks the end of an era that lasted over 5,000 years, according to the Mayan “Long Count” calendar. Some believe that the date, which coincides with the December solstice, marks the end of the world as foretold by Mayan hieroglyphs, an idea ridiculed by scholars. The Maya didn't say much about what would happen next, after a 5,125-year cycle comes to an end. So into that void have rushed occult writers, bloggers and New Age visionaries foreseeing all manner of monumental change, from doomsday to a new age of enlightenment. At sunrise on Friday, December 21, an era closes in the Maya Long Count calendar, an event that has been likened by different groups to the end of days, the start of a new, more spiritual age or a good reason to hang out at old Maya temples.

A man walks past street art in east London, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The clock is ticking down to Dec. 21, the supposed end of the Mayan calendar, and from China to California to Mexico, thousands are getting ready for what they think is going to be a fateful day.? Photo by AP
A man walks past street art in east London, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The clock is ticking down to Dec. 21, the supposed end of the Mayan calendar, and from China to California to Mexico, thousands are getting ready for what they think is going to be a fateful day.? Photo by AP
Aborigines ?Kekchi?, from Coban, gather as they protest a day before the Oxlajuj Baktun celebration at the Tikal Mayan ruins in Peten December 20, 2012. Indigenous activists protested outside Guatemala's ancient ruins of Tikal on Thursday as members of the country's poverty-stricken Mayan communities seek to draw international attention to their plight ahead of festivities to mark the end of the Mayan calendar. ? Photo by Reuters
Aborigines ?Kekchi?, from Coban, gather as they protest a day before the Oxlajuj Baktun celebration at the Tikal Mayan ruins in Peten December 20, 2012. Indigenous activists protested outside Guatemala's ancient ruins of Tikal on Thursday as members of the country's poverty-stricken Mayan communities seek to draw international attention to their plight ahead of festivities to mark the end of the Mayan calendar. ? Photo by Reuters
Yashen (Right) and Neetu, staff of the bar Carnegie's, pose as they hold a flyer for the ?end of the world' party, in Hong kong on December 21, 2012. ? Photo by AFP
Yashen (Right) and Neetu, staff of the bar Carnegie's, pose as they hold a flyer for the ?end of the world' party, in Hong kong on December 21, 2012. ? Photo by AFP
Students jump together to pose for photographers in front of a mock pyramid after the countdown time when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. ? Photo by AP
Students jump together to pose for photographers in front of a mock pyramid after the countdown time when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. ? Photo by AP
Guatemalan Mayan natives take part in celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 20, 2012. ? Photo by AFP
Guatemalan Mayan natives take part in celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 20, 2012. ? Photo by AFP
Members of a folkloric group perform during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. ? Photo by AFP
Members of a folkloric group perform during celebrations marking the end of the Mayan age, December 20, 2012 at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. Ceremonies are being held to celebrate the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era on December 21. ? Photo by AFP
A plane flies over a snow-capped, pyramid-shaped peak, Siljak, in the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 200km southeast from capital Belgrade, December 20, 2012. Rtanj is selling itself as the best place to survive the looming apocalypse - which will fall on December 21, according to mystics whose calculations depend on the ending of an era in the 5,125-year-old Mayan calendar. ? Photo by Reuters
A plane flies over a snow-capped, pyramid-shaped peak, Siljak, in the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 200km southeast from capital Belgrade, December 20, 2012. Rtanj is selling itself as the best place to survive the looming apocalypse - which will fall on December 21, according to mystics whose calculations depend on the ending of an era in the 5,125-year-old Mayan calendar. ? Photo by Reuters
Carlos Tun, a Mayan priest, prays and participates in the pre-Hispanic mass of ?Primera Conexion? and ?Sincronizacion Espiritual? (First Connection and Spiritual Synchronization), to commemorate the 13th Baktun, outside the Chi Ixim church in Tactic, Alta Verapaz region, December 20, 2012. ? Photo by Reuters
Carlos Tun, a Mayan priest, prays and participates in the pre-Hispanic mass of ?Primera Conexion? and ?Sincronizacion Espiritual? (First Connection and Spiritual Synchronization), to commemorate the 13th Baktun, outside the Chi Ixim church in Tactic, Alta Verapaz region, December 20, 2012. ? Photo by Reuters
Turkish gendarmes stand at a check point in Sirince December 20, 2012. Thousands of foreign and local tourists are expected to flock to Sirince, a small Turkish village near the ancient Greek city Ephesus ruins, which is believed to be one of the few places on earth that will survive the Mayan calendar doomsday this Friday. ? Photo by Reuters
Turkish gendarmes stand at a check point in Sirince December 20, 2012. Thousands of foreign and local tourists are expected to flock to Sirince, a small Turkish village near the ancient Greek city Ephesus ruins, which is believed to be one of the few places on earth that will survive the Mayan calendar doomsday this Friday. ? Photo by Reuters
Duch Pieter van der Meer (Left) and a friend uncover on December 19, 2012 his Norwegian lifeboat in his garden in Kootwijkerbroek with which he can save 35 persons in case of a global apocalypse hits on 21 December.. ? Photo by AFP
Duch Pieter van der Meer (Left) and a friend uncover on December 19, 2012 his Norwegian lifeboat in his garden in Kootwijkerbroek with which he can save 35 persons in case of a global apocalypse hits on 21 December.. ? Photo by AFP

Comments (1) Closed




hitesh
Dec 22, 2012 11:37am
May be we are already passing through apocalypse !