Ringing alarms

Climate change is a matter of urgent distress, globally. This gallery presents the alarming but bearable reactions to it.—Images by Reuters

A young boy cools off in the water from a playground sprinkler in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Temperatures are set to top out in the mid-90s degrees Fahrenheit (35 degrees Celsius) through Thursday in New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, DC, with heat index values that measure humidity reaching into the upper-90s and low-100s—Photo by Reuters
A young boy cools off in the water from a playground sprinkler in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Temperatures are set to top out in the mid-90s degrees Fahrenheit (35 degrees Celsius) through Thursday in New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, DC, with heat index values that measure humidity reaching into the upper-90s and low-100s—Photo by Reuters
A man shows a Badwater tattoo during the Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley National Park, California.—Photo by Reuters
A man shows a Badwater tattoo during the Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley National Park, California.—Photo by Reuters
Keith Straw, 58, competes during the Badwater Ultramarathon dressed in a tutu in Death Valley National Park. The 135-mile (217 km) race, which bills itself as the world's toughest foot race, goes from Death Valley to Mt. Whitney, California in temperatures which can reach 130 degrees Fahrenheit (55 Celsius).—Photo by Reuters
Keith Straw, 58, competes during the Badwater Ultramarathon dressed in a tutu in Death Valley National Park. The 135-mile (217 km) race, which bills itself as the world's toughest foot race, goes from Death Valley to Mt. Whitney, California in temperatures which can reach 130 degrees Fahrenheit (55 Celsius).—Photo by Reuters
A swan is inspected by a Queen's Swan Upper during the annual Swan Upping ceremony on the River Thames between Shepperton and Windsor in southern England. Young cygnets are counted and swans and cygnets are assessed for signs of injury or disease during the ceremony. The five-day census of the swan population dates back to the twelfth century when the Crown claimed ownership of all mute swans. Today, the Crown retains the right to ownership of all unmarked mute swans in open water, but The Queen only exercises her
A swan is inspected by a Queen's Swan Upper during the annual Swan Upping ceremony on the River Thames between Shepperton and Windsor in southern England. Young cygnets are counted and swans and cygnets are assessed for signs of injury or disease during the ceremony. The five-day census of the swan population dates back to the twelfth century when the Crown claimed ownership of all mute swans. Today, the Crown retains the right to ownership of all unmarked mute swans in open water, but The Queen only exercises her
Erwyn Diaz works out on a rubber track during a hot day in New York. The National Weather Service issued heat advisories for dozens of northeastern cities and surrounding areas in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, upstate New York and Long Island.—Photo by Reuters
Erwyn Diaz works out on a rubber track during a hot day in New York. The National Weather Service issued heat advisories for dozens of northeastern cities and surrounding areas in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, upstate New York and Long Island.—Photo by Reuters
Signs protesting the process of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, are seen near the town of Calicoon Center, New York.  The oil and gas industry is finding that less is more in the push to treat and recycle water used in the hydraulic fracturing process.—Photo by Reuters
Signs protesting the process of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, are seen near the town of Calicoon Center, New York. The oil and gas industry is finding that less is more in the push to treat and recycle water used in the hydraulic fracturing process.—Photo by Reuters
The Sheldon Glacier with Mount Barre in the background, is seen from Ryder Bay near Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctica, in this NASA/British Antarctic Survey handout photo. Sea levels could rise by 2.3 metres for each degree Celsius that global temperatures increase and they will remain high for centuries to come, according to a new study by Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.—Photo by Reuters
The Sheldon Glacier with Mount Barre in the background, is seen from Ryder Bay near Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctica, in this NASA/British Antarctic Survey handout photo. Sea levels could rise by 2.3 metres for each degree Celsius that global temperatures increase and they will remain high for centuries to come, according to a new study by Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.—Photo by Reuters
A pair of giant panda twins born to Lun Lun are pictured at Zoo Atlanta in Atlanta. A giant panda at the Atlanta zoo delivered an extra bundle of joy on Monday when she gave birth to twins, an apparent surprise to zoo officials who had been excitedly anticipating the birth of a single cub.—Photo by Reuters
A pair of giant panda twins born to Lun Lun are pictured at Zoo Atlanta in Atlanta. A giant panda at the Atlanta zoo delivered an extra bundle of joy on Monday when she gave birth to twins, an apparent surprise to zoo officials who had been excitedly anticipating the birth of a single cub.—Photo by Reuters
A man swims in a polluted canal in Beijing. The temperature in Beijing rose to 34 degrees Celsius on Tuesday—Photo by Reuters
A man swims in a polluted canal in Beijing. The temperature in Beijing rose to 34 degrees Celsius on Tuesday—Photo by Reuters
People walk near hundreds of dead stingrays on the shore of the beach in Chachalacas. Villagers found the dead stingrays on Tuesday and alerted the authorities, who are investigating, according to local media.—Photo by Reuters
People walk near hundreds of dead stingrays on the shore of the beach in Chachalacas. Villagers found the dead stingrays on Tuesday and alerted the authorities, who are investigating, according to local media.—Photo by Reuters
A young boy kicks water as he stands on the banks of the East River in New York. The National Weather Service issued heat advisories for dozens of northeastern cities and surrounding areas in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, upstate New York and Long Island.—Photo by Reuters
A young boy kicks water as he stands on the banks of the East River in New York. The National Weather Service issued heat advisories for dozens of northeastern cities and surrounding areas in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, upstate New York and Long Island.—Photo by Reuters

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