20 September, 2014 / Ziqa'ad 24, 1435

Bombings targeting Shias kill 19 in Iraq

Published Jul 06, 2013 12:06am
People gather at the site of a suicide car bomb attack in the city of Samarra, some 100 km (62 miles) north of Baghdad July 5, 2013. — Photo by Reuters
People gather at the site of a suicide car bomb attack in the city of Samarra, some 100 km (62 miles) north of Baghdad July 5, 2013. — Photo by Reuters

BAGHDAD: A suicide attacker and a car bombing killed at least 19 people and wounded 38 in separate attacks Friday targeting Shias north of Baghdad.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attacks, the latest in an increasing wave of violence across the country.

Iraq has been facing its deadliest outburst of violence since 2008, with more than 2,000 people killed since the start of April.

The bloodshed appears to be largely the work of resurgent Sunni militants such as al Qaeda's Iraq branch, feeding off Sunni discontent with the Shia-led government.

The deadliest attack on Friday took place in Baghdad's Kiraiyat neighborhood as worshippers gathered after the evening call to prayers at the Hussienieh Ali Basha mosque.

A suicide bomber walked in during the service and detonated his explosives, killing 15 worshippers and wounding 32, a police officer and a medical official said.

Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorised to talk to the media.

Earlier Friday, an explosives-laden vehicle detonated near a Shia protest camp in the city of Samarra, a police officer said, speaking on condition of anonymity as he was not authorised to release information to the media.

The head of the Salahuddin provincial health directorate, Raed Ibrahim, later confirmed the casualty figures in the attack in Samarra, 95 kilometers north of Baghdad.

Since December, Iraq's Sunni minority has been staging demonstrations over what it calls second-class treatment by the Shia-led government. In some place clashes have erupted between security forces and protesters.

Violence increased sharply in April and May, with frequent bombings in civilian areas raising concerns that a widespread sectarian conflict could once again break out in Iraq.

The bloodshed accelerated after a deadly April 23 crackdown by security forces on a Sunni anti-government protest in the northern town of Hawija in which 23 people were killed.

Hoping to stem the violence with a sign of solidarity, both Sunni and Shia worshippers gathered Friday at Abdul-Qadir al-Gailani Mosque in downtown Baghdad to kneel and pray side by side.

As they prayed, the mosque remained under tight security.


Do you have information you wish to share with Dawn.com? You can email our News Desk to share news tips, reports and general feedback. You can also email the Blog Desk if you have an opinion or narrative to share, or reach out to the Special Projects Desk to send us your Photos, or Videos.

More From This Section

Comments (2) (Closed)


Greek Tragedy
Jul 06, 2013 01:49am

Terrible! Night time satellite pictures of Baghdad showed all Sunni areas had been emptied by Shia sectarians death squads with the help of the US occupation forces

Hussain Naqvi
Jul 06, 2013 05:37pm

The cursedl land will not attain stability and peace until The Saviour of the humanity appears to spread Islam whenit will be the only region across the world. Let us pray to Almighty God for his earliest appearance so that He could rescue the oppressed people and bring justice to all.