The Jhang of Abdus Salam

Updated Jul 02, 2013 05:06pm

For whom the bell tolls

The 16th day of April 1853 is special in the Indian history. The day was a public holiday. At 3:30 pm, as the 21 guns roared together, the first train carrying Lady Falkland, wife of Governor of Bombay, along with 400 special invitees, steamed off from Bombay to Thane.

Ever since the engine rolled off the tracks, there have been new dimensions to the distances, relations and emotions. Abaseen Express, Khyber Mail and Calcutta Mail were not just the names of the trains but the experiences of hearts and souls. Now that we live in the days of burnt and non functional trains, I still have a few pleasant memories associated with train travels. These memoirs are the dialogues I had with myself while sitting by the windows or standing at the door as the train moved on. In the era of Cloud and Wi-Fi communications, I hope you will like them.


enter image description hereOther than Sultan and Chander Bhan, Jhang has references which the national history has chosen to forget. One such reference is Dr Abdus Salam, who is intentionally being erased from public memory, unfortunately, on accounts of religion. Official historians stumble upon his reference much similarly as they deal with the chapter of genetics in advanced biology textbooks; staple it and think it forgotten.

Born in the small dwellings of Santok Das, Abdus Salam spent most of his childhood in Jhang. His grandfather was a religious scholar and his father was an employee in the education department and so, it was the mainstay in Abdus Salam’s household. There are rumours that his parents saw a dream forewarning them about his illustrious career and then there are stories about him being taken to school for admission in the first grade but qualifying for the fourth grade instead. Regardless of these anecdotes, his academic life was indeed, a matter of honor. When anyone inquired about his young age and distinction in examinations, he simply raised his finger and pointed towards the sky, attributing it towards Allah. Those were the times of the Raj and religion was a private affair, rather than now when it is determined by parliamentary committees under the influence of protests.

Despite his love for literature, Salam took up sciences when he joined college. He opted for this route for qualifying for ICS, a job much envied by his family but after being turned down on medical grounds; he decided to pursue further education. Cambridge University, those days, offered scholarships for which Abdus Salam applied, despite his frail economic conditions. Between the benevolence of Sir Choto Ram, a minister in the Punjab Government and Abdus Salam’s luck, a candidate dropped off from the final list. The much desired Cambridge scholarship, for which people applied for months in advance and prayed for days, now belonged to him. That year, when people across the world arrived at Cambridge with their expensive effects, a young man from Jhang with his sole steel trunk was also amongst them.

After the completion of his Masters degree, Abdus Salam was offered scholarships for further studies and various employment opportunities but Pakistan was a free land now and it needed men like him. He came back and started teaching at the Government College, Lahore, his alma mater. He taught mathematics in the morning and coached students for football in the evening.

Dealing with differentials and equations in the first half of the day; and taking the lost team for Doodh Jalebi to Chau Burji at night, this young professor was certainly not the two sides of the coins but rather a prism which imparted seven colors to every incident ray. Lahore was subject to anti-Ahmadiyya violence in 1953 for the first time and it cut Salam off his base. He, like so many others, was at a loss of identity.

A month later, he was offered an instructional post at the Imperial College, London which he accepted. The 30-year-old, youngest ever assistant professor of Imperial College, London, was a Pakistani now.

Having settled the Martial Law issue and the political manipulation, Ayub Khan arranged for Abdus Salam’s come back. He is credited for drafting the first comprehensive scientific policy. Abdus Salam went on to found SUPPARCO and arranged for scholarships, which helped hundreds of Pakistani scientists’ to educate themselves abroad. Making PINSTECH, Karachi Nuclear plant and Atomic Energy Commission, a reality and leading the IAEA mission, Abdus Salam set the grounds for scientific research. Many research institutes, from where hundreds of Islamic missions take off for reformation every now and then, were once founded by this non-Muslim scientist. Regarding his contributions towards Pakistan’s nuclear programme, he was instrumental in the Multan meeting and initial research but when the Bhutto government declared Ahmadis non-Muslims, he left for England. Despite the change in countries, his heart never changed for Pakistan and he kept guiding all scientists involved in the programme till he breathed his last.

He was offered the nationality of all those countries whose asylum seekers, today, lead the criticism on his faith. On being asked that why he avoided Pakistan, he replied, it was not him who avoided Pakistan but Pakistan that avoided him.

Abdus Salam’s credentials of were finally acknowledged by his nomination for the Nobel Prize in 1979. He worked for the Grand Unification Theory that declared a single source for all forces. When the prize was announced, he offered nawafil in gratitude. On the day of reception, Stockholm saw for the first time a recipient dressed in the Pakistani national dress, reciting Soorah Mulk in the acceptance speech.

Then return [your] vision twice again. [Your] vision will return to you humbled while it is fatigued. Chapter 67: Verse 4

The same year, the Pakistani government, rewarded him with the highest civil award. It is not the case that the state had not valued Abdus Salam but his vision and farsightedness was on a constant colliding course with our resources, rigidity and short shortsightedness. The government did honor him by issuing a postage stamp but when he proposed the making of a centre of excellence for research and technology, the then finance minister turned it down, declaring that the country could not afford a luxury hotel for scientists.

After he had received the Nobel Prize, he chose to visit Lahore, first. On landing, he headed straight to Data Saheb and then went to the Government College, Lahore. His humility held both the places with equal reverence and despite his 300 plus awards, he remained the same Abdus Salam of the yesteryear's, attributing his all achievements to God. In a public gathering, someone commented that Jhang was initially famous for Heer and now will be famed for Abdus Salam’s Nobel Prize. He remarked that there are hundreds of Nobel Laureates but only one Heer.

While Abdus Salam opted to be buried Pakistan, little did he know that he would require a magisterial permission for his tombstone. Abdus Salam might have believed that if the Quaid’s speech of 11th August 1947 had finally found its way, his speech of 1944 at Srinagar would also be made public one day.

Besides the salinity, the fertility of Jhang is being ravished by something else as well.

Read this blog in Urdu here.

Listen to this blog in Urdu:


Do you have information you wish to share with Dawn.com? You can email our News Desk to share news tips, reports and general feedback. You can also email the Blog Desk if you have an opinion or narrative to share, or reach out to the Special Projects Desk to send us your Photos, or Videos.


Muhammad Hassan Miraj is a federal government employee.


The views expressed by this blogger and in the following reader comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Dawn Media Group.

More From This Author

Uch Sharif — II

Of these graves, the oldest, belongs to Jalal ud Din Surkhposh. This 14th century father-saint of South Punjab was...

Murder in Rabwah

Dr Mehdi Ali Qamar is today’s count for the self-righteous in Pakistan.

Comments (76) Closed




Faizan
Jul 01, 2013 08:12pm

I find it very saddening that our youth is unaware of this great pakistani and saddening to see his achievement undermined due to his religious beliefs this is not jinnah's pakistan but rather an adulterated version of a radicals emirates we live in

Abbastoronto
Jul 01, 2013 08:13pm

While no doubt Salam was dealt with unjustly by Pakistan and Muslims, there are a few things that bother me.

  1. Islam does not believe in borders. Said Iqbal so candidly and succintly:

Threshold
Jul 01, 2013 08:15pm

I Love Dr Abdul Salam . And I M Salute This Great PErsonalty because his thinking is too good for pakistan and will salute them . thanks for sharing

kamljit Singh
Jul 01, 2013 08:15pm

Aptly said, 'He was offered the nationality of all those countries whose asylum seekers, today, lead the criticism on his faith.' Had he been in India, he could have been the President before Dr. A. P. J.Abdul Kalam (the missile man of India).

MAB
Jul 01, 2013 08:22pm

Loved every bit of it this heart rending piece. Sham on us all for disowning our true heroes and praising murderers and butchers.

Mubashir
Jul 01, 2013 08:29pm

Assalamu Alaikum wa Rahmatul Allah wa Bara katuhu, thanks Muhammad Hassan Miraj sahib really you write nice and informative article, Dr. Abdul Salam was great man in he Muslim world he done so many things for them.

hafeez
Jul 01, 2013 09:10pm

he will makes a very good job and take very step for media ..

Guest63
Jul 01, 2013 09:31pm

Indeed , Dr A.Salam never avoided Pakistan of himself , It was Pakistan who willfully avoided the Dr . The current PM Nawaz Sharif , Never misses any time and any moment when ever he speaks of Atomic Bombs (that he nawaz Sharif made Pakistan an atomic country ) BUT I wonder if he ever will have courage and moral up righteousness To once announce on a national or intl nation forum , that He admired and respect Dr A.Salam of Jhang ..... Indeed there are hundreds of nobel laureates BUT THERE IS ONLY ONE HEER of jhang among them . May Your soul rest in heavenly peace and propsperity dear Dr A.Salam of Jhang , you made me raise my head as a proud Pakistani in this community of world .

nadeem qadri
Jul 01, 2013 09:39pm

To the family of Dr. Abdus Salam!

I salute Dr. Abdus Salam as a Sunni Muslim Pakistani. A salute from a fellow human being. An apology from a Pakistani Muslim for the treatment of his fellows, to you and to your community. We are proud that you were a Pakistani.

Farrukh Naqvi
Jul 01, 2013 10:02pm

Thank you for your wonderful writing.

lahore_p
Jul 01, 2013 10:21pm

Well said Hassan Miraj and a non biased review in a land where fanatics mixed with corrupt rule. I hope things will change one day. Right now there is no vision for that. Whole sub-continent is facing the same turmoil but very few acknowledge it. People like you are a hope for the future.

Imran
Jul 01, 2013 10:26pm

The doc was not old enough, otherwise the writer would have bestowed on him the credit of founding Pakistan ;-)

ahmad
Jul 01, 2013 11:03pm

Thank you Abdus Salam for what you did for Pakistan

Dr. Babar Khan
Jul 01, 2013 11:29pm

The greatness of Abdus Salaam as a man and a scientist is only magnified by the fact that he created more opportunities for muslim scientists than any other man in recent memory, despite the prejudice, bigotry and hatred that he faced. The best way for all Pakistanis to honor his memory is to stand up to bigotry and hatred wherever they see it.

Nizamuddin Ahmad
Jul 02, 2013 12:17am

Whenever I read an article or a write-up about Dr. Salam ,makes me sad breaks my heart. We the Pakistanis have treated Dr. Salam with malice, disgust and in a hateful way. Sadly the educated class did nothing. Worst thing against such treatment is to do nothing. I was a graduate student in Milan in 1967, not far from his laboratory where he did research for his project. One of my professors always talked about him and always had good thing to say.I was very proud of him being a Pakistani scientist. His faith was the main reason for the mistreatment. According to the cnstitution of Pakistan he was a Muslim of different . sect. The word sect is debatable in the const Regardless of any argument he was a gift and native son of Pakistan. We all should be ashamed...

Kesar
Jul 02, 2013 12:41am

Abdul Salam is a true Pakistani hero not the fake Qadeer Khan.

Muhammad Awais
Jul 02, 2013 12:43am

First ever Pakistani to won Nobel Prize in Physics and indeed a lot of work on the Metaphysics was done by him and then teaching in Imperial college. What a great man you have very well explained his life history along with his work.

Pervaiz
Jul 02, 2013 01:23am

Very nicely written Miraj Sb. I will also appreciate if you write on some renowened Sikhs and Hindus of those cities.

Faraz
Jul 02, 2013 01:34am

Who was the finance minister that turned down his request for establishing a centre of excellence for research and technology?

Zubair Murshed
Jul 02, 2013 01:55am

Dear Hasan Miraj,

Excellent pieces of writing on Jhang. The other that is ravishing Jhang is also ravishing the whole country bye the way. slowly the whole country is turning into a bigger Jhang - off course not the jhang of the Heer or the Salam, but the Jhang of the Salinity and its sister.

Gulbaz Mushtaq
Jul 02, 2013 02:54am

Well done Sir. Carry on excellent work.

Q.Zahid
Jul 02, 2013 02:57am

Brilliant as ever. May Allah The Exalted give more power, fairness and truthfulness to your thoughts, ideas and pen, Amen.

SBB
Jul 02, 2013 03:07am

That's an amazing story, told by a great story-teller.. Thank you for this. You're brought out the specifics of Dr. Salam's achievements very well. And it's so deeply true that while there are hundreds of Nobel Prize winners, there's only one Heer.

Tahira
Jul 02, 2013 04:28am

Besides being a great scientist, Salam was a very noble, humble and sensitive person. He honestly struggled to raise the level of scientists from developing countries. Ask any African physics professor who has spent summer months working on the publication of his research work, you will find enormous gratitude for Salam in their experiences. Some student should be given a grant by HEC to collect the statements from all those scientists who benefited from his sizzling love for the scientists from poorer countries.

Bharath
Jul 02, 2013 06:50am

If there are more like Abdul Salam that you don't accept as your own, please send them to India. They will be welcomed there.

Khan
Jul 02, 2013 06:46am

Mairaj JI tussi great ho kindly write about Lashkar e jhangvi of jhang, Sipah e sahaba, Lashkar e Toiba, punjabi Taliban and other fanatics based in Punjab, so that the people know the real face of current Punjab instead of admiring the past glory of Punjab.

ayub
Jul 02, 2013 07:28am

He was indeed a great man but unfortunately lost in memory due to deep rooted prejudice in our illiterate fanatic society. May Allah guide our nation on the right path.

Syed A Zafar USA
Jul 02, 2013 07:47am

Although there are some pronunciation mistakes in Urdu blog, but over all, it is an eye opener. It is not only based on facts about the one and only legendary scientist of Pakistan Dr. Abdus-Salam, but also it reminds us how bias and losers we are as a nation. It is important to realize that it is written no where, not even in Holy Quran that God is Rabbul-Muslemeen and Holy Prophet Mohammad Sallal-laho alaihe wasallam (pbuh) is Rahmatul-Muslemeen (God and prophet Mohammad belong to Muslims only). The only words repeatedly used in holy Quran about God and prophet Mohammad (pbuh) are " Rabbul-aalameen and Rahmatul-lil-aalameen" That means God and his messengers and their blessings are universal. That is why the Sun and the Moon reflect the universal blessings of God. They equally rise for all human beings. So, how come we became the exclusive agent of God and religion, who gave us right to decide others' faith and believes, why we have to measure ones talent, services or loyalty based on his religious believes and why we have to hate, kill and discriminate with others in the name of religion?

It is unfortunate that we not only impose our thoughts on others, but also do not understand the meaning of "Fabe-ayye aale-rabbekuma tukazzeban" (which of the blessings of God can you refuse) Do we realize how much we hurt our country and how many jewels we lose just because of our hatred, bughz (grudge) and wrong understanding of the beautiful teachings of Islam?

"Hazaaron saal Nergis apny be-noori pay roti hai, bari mushkil say hotaa hai chaman mein deedahwar paida" It takes conscience, open hearts and minds. zafarsyed40@yahoo.com

Zia
Jul 02, 2013 08:03am

Well we can only say "zulmat mein aakey chamka, gumnam tha watan mein" Pakistan and Pakistanis have lost the train pity a nation as much as you can

Bharat Patel
Jul 02, 2013 08:19am

An Attitude that pervades Islam - Intolerance.

And that will cause or are already causing problems similar to Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Libya

KSD
Jul 02, 2013 09:46am

Indian people in the scientific circles refer to him as Professor Salam, not Dr. or Abdul Salam. It feels a bit strange that a person who has a street named after him at CERN, is remembered more for his faith in his homeland than for what he did not only for Pakistan but the whole continent. One can only hope that his gravesite will become a memorial someday. Given his humility, he probably would have preferred the title of this blog to be, "The Salam of Jhang."

Jamil Ahmed
Jul 02, 2013 09:58am

He lives in hearts of people who value him. I hope that some days we will shed our hatred in the name of Islam and give this great son of soil his due credit and place in our history.

faiyaz
Jul 02, 2013 11:08am

We need people with guts like Mairaj Sahib in this country.Lets also not forget that most of the Pakistani scientist have been and are being trained at the Trieste Institute in Italy which was established single handedly by Dr Abdul Salam.

Asad
Jul 02, 2013 11:31am

I'm a Pakistani. I'm a Muslim. I'm a Shia. And I salute Abdul Salam. I wish he were alive today so that I could have the honour to have lived in his time. It is time we recognized our national icons and heroes regardless of their creed, class and faith. Of course our religious scholars and muftis won't like it. But we should care for them less than they care for us. So far there's no fatwa against idolizing a national hero. Then why are we being so pathetic and not cherishing these great souls? Celebrating our nuclear tests and not recognizing Abdul Salam is epic hypocrisy which embodies our moral bankruptcy. Legislation. Anyone?

Javid Shirazi
Jul 02, 2013 11:46am

So enlightening. How sad that a great mind felt persecuted in his own country.

Mohammad Adam Khan
Jul 02, 2013 12:22pm

Good man

TruthSeeker
Jul 02, 2013 12:55pm

"Abdul Salam set the grounds for scientific research. Many research institutes, from where hundreds of Islamic missions take off for reformation every now and then, were once founded by this non-Muslim scientist." What an ironical give away by this writer....in spite of everything, he stoops to the same level of humiliation that the Ahmediya community is being subjected to by the State of Pakistan. '....non-muslim scientist'.......declared by whom? the state? What a shame!

Hamid Awan
Jul 02, 2013 01:01pm

Well we Pakistanis dont need Science and Technology as Innovations and Technology are a Yahoodi Saazish against us . So we dont need to discuss about Abdus Salam rather we should only pray and let the West indulge in worldly desires. Also We should be proud that we have the World biggest Religious Industry and Fatwa Making industry.

Moreover I hope this Government will ban Electricity, Modern Day Medicine and Internet that are developed by Non Muslims in the West as Momin neither needs Electricity nor Internet as We are ghairatmand and can live in Caves where no Saazish can haunt us.

Anees
Jul 02, 2013 01:03pm

Abdus Salam - yet again.

samar
Jul 02, 2013 01:40pm

Dr Salam became the victim of rigid social attitudes and state discrimination against his community when Z.A. Bhutto through an act of parliament declared the Ahmadis non-Muslim in 1974. Heartbroken at the humiliation, he left Pakistan in protest to live in Europe where in 1979 he was awarded the Nobel for his groundbreaking research in theoretical physics; soon roads were named after him in Geneva and Trieste, if not in Islamabad or Jhang. The same year, as it happened, Bhutto was hanged by Gen Zia

gary
Jul 02, 2013 01:43pm

Until the Muslims accept that all religions are same, there will never be peace in the Muslim world, and Muslims will always be at the bottom of the heap.

Syed Hussain Akbari
Jul 02, 2013 02:21pm

Heer and Prof. Dr. Abdus Salaam are the icons of Jhang. Former is the symbol of love and sacrifice and the later is the symbol of knowledge, patriotism and friendship. Thanks to some sufis and poets Heer is being remembered. Unfortunately, Dr.Salaam who should have been treated as the hero of the country is intentionally being fogotten.Thanks to the Mullahs and perhaps also to late Mr.Bhutto. Oh yes, there is yet another symbol from Jhang. And it is Lashkar-e-Jhangvi who have nothing to do with love, knowledge, patriotism and friendship. They are symbol of hatred, iliteracy, enemity and terrorism. Now the politicians are intending to take interest in them. What a choice !

Mir Taqi
Jul 02, 2013 02:52pm

@TruthSeeker: I think the author is being sarcastic here.

Zeel
Jul 02, 2013 03:13pm

In India if a community is declared Non-Hindu, the adherents of that sect will jump with joy as they will be eligible for innumerable benefits like scholarships, loans, seats in educational institutions etc.

Hasan
Jul 02, 2013 03:37pm

@TruthSeeker: May be he is being sarcastic.

sajid
Jul 02, 2013 04:14pm

@TruthSeeker: these people cannot see the forest because the trees are in the way. This mans grave was desecrated by the state if he is a muslim or not it is surely that is for god to judge and not the likes of me and the journalist that writes this. I could find you people in pakistan that would declare shias non muslim sunna al jamaat heretics slafis misguided so who makes the ultimate decision in our country i suppose its the majority

sajid
Jul 02, 2013 04:13pm

@Anees: As a nation we need heros like these although im sure youd rather we were eulogising hakeemullah masood or maulana aziz or even qadri saab

Qasim
Jul 02, 2013 04:51pm

beautifully written. We shall have more of Abdus Salam. May Allah grant him Jannah, for he did more for our country and nation than all of the clerics who declared him non-muslim will ever do.

kazim
Jul 02, 2013 05:07pm

@Imran:

very lame

Iqbal Syed
Jul 02, 2013 05:51pm

@TruthSeeker: It was only said in a satirical sense...

Tahir Chaudhry
Jul 02, 2013 06:17pm

Thanks: Mr.Muhammad Hassan Miraj.

Omer
Jul 02, 2013 08:18pm

So this guy helped pakistan create nuclear technology.

Dearborn Iffy
Jul 02, 2013 09:16pm

Hi Uncle,

Awfully nice of you to pop in and talk about a subject of which, once again, you haven't the faintest idea - much in line and in vanity that you show in other topics.

sagacious
Jul 02, 2013 09:23pm

@Qasim: It was Bhutto who declared them non-muslim. What about that? Was Bhutto a cleric?

Mashhood
Jul 02, 2013 09:39pm

@kazim: God has stamped on their hearts, ears and eyes .... Time to think!!!

Riaz Ahmad
Jul 02, 2013 10:02pm

Even Allah forsakes a nation that prefers antiquated retrogrades mullahs to one of the finest scholars the rest of the world celebrated and admired with a Nobel prize. The current condition in which Pakistani society finds itself is enough proof of what I am talking about.

ranga
Jul 02, 2013 11:14pm

@Abbastoronto: I believe weed is easily available in Toranto. Is that the reason for your incoherent thoughts?

Naveed Khan
Jul 02, 2013 11:51pm

Every Pakistani should read about Dr. Abdus Salam, get inspiration and pay tribute to him. He was a great patriot an outstanding scientist and always kept Pakistan name attached to him. A country that educated him, nurtured him, provided his intellect.

FK
Jul 03, 2013 12:44am

Hats off to Dr. Abdus Salam for being a patriotic Pakistani and a true Muslim. Kudos to Dawn for printing this and making it available in Urdu. @abbasstoronto - make you, a most ironic argument!

Munawar Bajwa
Jul 03, 2013 12:54am

Dear MUHAMMAD HASSAN MIRAJ Sb,

Thank you for writing about Abdus Salam Doctor.May Allah bless Doctor Abus Slam a place in Paradise. amen

Truthseeker
Jul 03, 2013 03:13am

@ Iqbal syed/@ Hasan - I didn't see the satire, it was a matter of fact statement. Anyway, I'd like to one day find out , if I can, how Pakistani's are able to live with so much hate around them. Almost a decade ago, in London, on a door to door marketing spree on Eid day, I happened to knock on the door of an Ahmadiya family and they graciously offered the traditional 'Seweyin'. I's bewildered to find that many of my Pakistani colleagues were shocked and did not hesitate to inform me that it was not allowed to eat at their homes and uttered the 'wajibul Qatl' epithet if it was a joke. These problems exist in most countries, but by and large, the thrust of the powers that be (in progressive societies) is to reduce this sectarian/religious hate. Only in Pakistan, it is openly encouraged, rather celebrated without an ounce of shame. Not one person of note willing to come forward and say that they may not agree with their interpretation of religion, but nevertheless, they have an equal stake in the nation and society. How could one do this injustice to another human being on matters of faith and belief. Do you Pakistani's feel ashamed at this? How can you live like this and still treat and persecute 'others' this way. What kind of nation do you envision? You almost wiped out to oblivion, all well to do minorities (Hindus and Sikhs); yet you want to be respected abroad? Do you feel helpless and cringe at the thought of not being able to do anything about this? How can families gather at dinner and not be cognizant of so much violence perpetrated on other human beings on account of their differing beliefs?

I've almost started feeling ashamed of saying I'm a muslim, is there anyone else who would share this feeling?

commonsense
Jul 03, 2013 04:48am

Actually, professor Salam failed to acknowledge and understand Pakistani Muslims' great Theory of Religion that has turned Pakistan into a modern, educated and wealthy nation leading the world in every walk of life today. People like Salam dont even deserve to born in such a country.

Pakistan and its people are so unfortunate!!!

Feroz
Jul 03, 2013 09:29am

His faith had nothing to do with his contribution to physics. If anything, Professor's contribution to the physics had a lot to do with faith, which baiscally means that the faith can go to hell, and science is here to be explored and as he had mentioned in many interviews, faith means crap if it cant be proved. Oh I so wish that he chose economics to make a living. The world would e such a peaceful place.

Fazal Karim
Jul 03, 2013 10:49am

If a man like Abdul Salam follows Hazrat Ghulam Ahmed and still feels proud to be Muslim, there is food for thought for scholars to rethink about philosophy of Hazrat Ghulam Amed.

TruthSeeker
Jul 03, 2013 10:59am

@ Iqbal syed/@ Hasan - I didn't see the satire, it was a matter of fact statement. Anyway, I'd like to one day find out , if I can, how Pakistani's are able to live with so much hate around them. Almost a decade ago, in London, on a door to door marketing spree on Eid day, I happened to knock on the door of an Ahmadiya family and they graciously offered the traditional 'Seweyin'. I's bewildered to find that many of my Pakistani colleagues were shocked and did not hesitate to inform me that it was not allowed to eat at their homes and uttered the 'wajibul Qatl' epithet if it was a joke. Contd.

TruthSeeker
Jul 03, 2013 11:00am

Contd:- These problems exist in most countries, but by and large, the thrust of the powers that be (in progressive societies) is to reduce this sectarian/religious hate. Only in Pakistan, it is openly encouraged, rather celebrated without an ounce of shame. Not one person of note willing to come forward and say that they may not agree with their interpretation of religion, but nevertheless, they have an equal stake in the nation and society. How could one do this injustice to another human being on matters of faith and belief. Do you Pakistani's feel ashamed at this? How can you live like this and still treat and persecute 'others' this way. What kind of nation do you envision? You almost wiped out to oblivion, all well to do minorities (Hindus and Sikhs); yet you want to be respected abroad? Do you feel helpless and cringe at the thought of not being able to do anything about this? How can families gather at dinner and not be cognizant of so much violence perpetrated on other human beings on account of their differing beliefs?

I've almost started feeling ashamed of saying I'm a muslim, is there anyone else who would share this feeling?

Tajammal
Jul 03, 2013 12:47pm

@Bharath: .....and they will be treated as 'Prof. Khalil Chishti'

Mahmood
Jul 03, 2013 12:50pm

@Khan: Please let him to live!

Khan Wali
Jul 03, 2013 12:59pm

@kamljit Singh: Sardar Ji zara makhan kam lagao!

Dr Azam Gill
Jul 03, 2013 07:02pm

Another fine piece, Miraj Sahib. I hope to have doodh jalebi with you one day! Until then, bon app

@H__3
Jul 03, 2013 09:59pm

Hassan! What are you doing in the Government. Start writing professionally!

Ali Naqvi
Jul 03, 2013 10:27pm

If you ask any Pakistani, young or old "do you know who was Dr Abus Salam". First words that come out from their mouth are "oh I know he was a Qadiyani and left Pakistan". I wish it was more like "Oh I know he was the first Pakistani physicist who won a Nobel Prize and laid the foundation of a theory which resulted in discovering the god particle"

Amjad Shuaib
Jul 04, 2013 12:08am

We are surely an ungrateful nation as we could not honour a hero who brought, respect and honour to Pakistan.

Sonia K
Jul 04, 2013 10:48am

@Feroz: Mr. Feroz if Dr.Abdus Salam would have thought faith would mean crap if cant be proven, he wouldn't be visiting his roots even after 300 awards coz Muslim faith in fact can't be proven materially. It is simply f a i t h meaning believing in the unknown or uncertain!!! So kindly do not conclude on behalf of the doc, coz he was a very humble man who believed in God and attributed his achievements to him like any Muslim and even took steps when the Constitution declared him a Non-Muslim!!!!

Mohammad Adam Khan
Jul 04, 2013 12:15pm

Actually, we are always do late to praise our heroes.

bushra anas
Jul 04, 2013 04:46pm

Salaam Sir!