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9:30 pm Interview with Bilal Tanweer

Bilal Tanweer spoke to Dawn.com about his book.

9:00 pm Summary of Day one

The second Lahore Literary Festival was inaugurated among local and international delegates and intellectuals.

German, French and Italian ambassadors spoke on the need to highlight positive image of Pakistan around the globe and how their respective countries play significant role in maintaining and enhancing the culture.

This year’s festival has been expanded to three days and over hundred speakers are participating.

Historian Fakeer S. Aijazuddin took the guests on a journey of 300 years old history of Lahore through a pictorial display of paintings and pictures.

Organizers distributed three special awards to legends Zia Mohyeddin and Farida Khanum for their life long contribution to art and literature.

Some of the popular sessions on the first day of the festival included discussion on the art of poetry recitation in “Zehra Apa aur Zia Mohyeddin kay Saath”, discussion on Vali Nasr's book launch of “The Dispensable Nation”; "Salam Bombay", where Mira Nair shared her experience in the film industry and "The Suitable Duo" with Vikram Seth.

Speakers in other sessions spoke about the culture and history of Lahore and changes in the behaviour of the people of this city over various eras.

Aitzaz Ahsan, Pran Nevile, Yashodhara Dalmia, Farida Batool, Shazia Sikander, Bilal Tanweer and Omar Shahid Hamid were some of the prominent speakers on the first day of the festival.

A painting and sculpture exhibition was on display for the art lovers in Lahore.

Visitors of all age groups showed up at the festival and participated in all activities. Food stalls and rain added to the festive feel of the occasion.

The day ended with Naheed Siddiqui’s kathak performance on Baba Bulleh Shah's kalaam.

The success of the first day can be calculated by the fact that many complained about not being able to watch the performance and attend various sessions due to the fully packed halls. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

8:20 pm Kathak performance by Nahid Siddiqui

– Photo by Asif Umar
– Photo by Asif Umar

– Photo by Asif Umar
– Photo by Asif Umar

8:00 pm Kathak performance by Nahid Siddiqui

– Photo by Asif Umar
– Photo by Asif Umar

– Photo by Hamza Cheema
– Photo by Hamza Cheema

– Photo by Hamza Cheema
– Photo by Hamza Cheema

6:30 pm Salaam Bombay

Mira Nair (R) with Mira Hashmi. – Photo by Asif Umar
Mira Nair (R) with Mira Hashmi. – Photo by Asif Umar

Mira Nair took the audience through a journey of the challenges she faced during her first film, Salam Bombay, which was later even nominated for the Oscars. Nair shared her experience, how she created the characters in the movie; inspired by the real life incidents and behaviour of the people on the streets. She hasn't studied filmmaking, but has learnt to do things by herself.

Nair said that the best part about making Salam Bombay was that children who were part of the movie knew they were making a film on themselves. One of the main challenges Nair faced was the funding for the film and even after much critical acclaim internationally, Bollywood distributors were reluctant to screen the film initially.

Nair is now working on a Broadway stage musical of Monsoon Wedding and Vishal Bharadwaj is the music director. She is also working on two films, one of them is based on a true story on a Bengali detective. She said the joy of making movies comes with everything which she believes in, and the risks every film brings with itself. Stories based on truth have always appealed to her and she believes that the society is numb to the situations they are surrounded in.

"Challenges are opportunities and never apologise for what you feel about things," Nair adds in the end. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

5:55pm Humare Zamaane ki Khahaniyaan

Julien Columeau. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Julien Columeau. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

5:55 pm Salaam Bombay

I’ve always questioned who is right and who is wrong in my movies. – Mira Nair

5:50 pm Salaam Bombay

Truth is more powerful than fiction. – Mira Nair

5:45 pm Salaam Bombay

The beauty of living between two places is that you have a different eye on things that you are numbed about. – Mira Nair

5:30 pm Book Launch: The Dispensable Nation

An average Pakistani should see value in relationship with America – Vali Nasr

5:30 pm Book Launch: The Dispensable Nation

Americans pretend they don’t like what is happening in Pakistan, but they still intend to do it. – Vali Nasr

5:30 pm Book Launch: The Dispensable Nation

In my opinion Pak-US relationship should deepen beyond military relationship. – Vali Nasr

5:20 pm Amrita Sher-Gil: Lahore's Lost Daughter

Yashodhara Dalmia. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Yashodhara Dalmia. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

5:15 pm Amrita Sher-Gil: Lahore's Lost Daughter

Salima Hashmi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Salima Hashmi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

5:00 pm

One of the book stalls at Alhamra Art Center. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
One of the book stalls at Alhamra Art Center. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

4:40 pm Zehra Apa aur Zia Mohyeddin ke Saath

Acting is a crucial part of the art of poetry renditions. – Zehra Nigah

4:40 pm Zehra Apa aur Zia Mohyeddin ke Saath

“Zehra Apa aur Zia Mohyeddin ke Saath" was one of the most applauded sessions at the first day of Lahore Literary Festival, as there were queues even outside the hall.

The focus of the conversation was the importance of the style of reciting poetry. Zia Mohyeddin criticised the style of today's poets who recite poetry in such a manner that their recitations change the meaning of the words. He said that every word written by a poet should be elaborated so that the underlying meaning of the words touches the heart of the listener.

Zehra Apa praised Zia Mohyeddin on delivering one of her stories by saying that it was recited in such a way that even she fell in love with her own writing.

Both the writers stressed on the fact that the essence of poetry should not be ruined during its delivery.

There is a symmetry in poetry which is not followed these days," Zia Mohyeddin said.

Zehra Apa added that acting skills are essential for reciting poetry and Zia Mohyeddin masters that art form as well.

Zia Mohyeddin also recited famous verses from Noon Meem Rashid's poems, which ended with a standing ovation for the two legendry artists by the enthusiastic audience of Lahore. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

4:36 pm Zehra Apa aur Zia Mohyeddin ke Saath

People should read poetry with the understanding of the underlying meaning of the words. – Zia Mohyeddin

4:35 pm Zehra Apa aur Zia Mohyeddin ke Saath

People should learn how to read Shakespeare. – Zia Mohyeddin

3:30 pm Delirium in Karachi

From L to R: Omar Shahid Hamid, Bilal Tanweer, Saba Imtiaz and H. M. Naqvi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
From L to R: Omar Shahid Hamid, Bilal Tanweer, Saba Imtiaz and H. M. Naqvi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

3:29 pm Lahore, Literature and Longing

Lahore is the city of music and melody makers – Pran Nevile

3:29 pm Lahore, Literature and Longing

Lahore is the city of music and melody makers – Pran Nevile

3:29 pm Deeda-e-Maana Kusha

Dr Tariq Hashmi (L) and Dr Mohammad Asif Awan. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Dr Tariq Hashmi (L) and Dr Mohammad Asif Awan. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

All Muslims are human but not all humans are Muslims. – Dr Tariq Hashmi

3:29 pm Lahore, Literature and Longing

Lahore's veins are now constricted. The city was known for its open heart. – Khalid Ahmed

3:26 pm Lahore, Literature and Longing

From the session, Lahore, Literature and Longing. – Photo by Asif Umar
From the session, Lahore, Literature and Longing. – Photo by Asif Umar

3:25 pm Lahore, Literature and Longing

Lahore has been a city of resistance, produced poetry and literature of resistance – Aitzaz Ahsan

3:12 pm Lahore, Literature and Longing

Lahore lost plurality and it's a tragedy. This is not the city I grew up in. – Aitzaz Ahsan

1:45 pm Unexpectedly, it has started raining. We can see carpets being rolled-up in the garden area and the food stalls wrapping up to move inside.

I am delighted to be invited to attend the Lahore Literary Festival. Oddly enough, I feel as if I participated in it a year before it was actually founded. — From Vikram Seth’s article The moon in Lahore

1:20 pm Lunch Break Lunch stalls are setting up as gray clouds cover the sky. We hope it doesn't rain while visitors are having lunch outside!

Sessions will resume at 2:30 pm.

Last year’s debut of the LLF drew over 30,000 people. This year we hope to double that audience as there are more and varied sessions, four core spaces at the venue, and a much wider array of tantalising thinkers from home and abroad who will not fail to attract more people. — Ahmed Rashid

Click here to read more

12:30 pm Welcome note Farida Khanum, "Malika-e-Ghazal" (Queen of Ghazal), received LLF award for her long time contributions in ghazal singing.

Historian, Fakir S. Aijazuddin, took the audience on a journey of Lahore's 300 year old history through pictures and paintings.

This year the festival has been expanded to three days and over hundred local and international speakers are participating in the festival. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

12:30 pm Welcome note

Zia Mohyeddin received LLF award. He mused that this was his first life time award. – Photo by Asif Umar
Zia Mohyeddin received LLF award. He mused that this was his first life time award. – Photo by Asif Umar

11:30 am Welcome note

Good morning, everyone! It's a chilly morning in Lahore and we're here at the Alhamra Art Center for the first day of the second Lahore Literary Festival.

The welcome note has begun. Stay tuned for pictures and quotes from various speakers throughout the day!

Lahore Literary Festival | 21st, 22nd & 23rd February | Alhamra Art Center
Lahore Literary Festival | 21st, 22nd & 23rd February | Alhamra Art Center

Dawn.com speaks to Mira Nair about her inspirations for adapting two very popular novels, 'The Namesake' and 'The Reluctant Fundamentalist', into screenplays.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Performance: Sachal Orchestra

– Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
– Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

– Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
– Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

– Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
– Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

Dawn.com speaks to Amit Chaudhuri.

8:15 pm Afghanistan on the Brink

A large number of visitors came to attend the last session of the second day of the Lahore Literary Festival. The panelists were Maliha Lodhi, Hina Rabbani Khar, Ahmad Rashid and Vali Nasir who partook in a heated discussion on Afghanistan.

All speakers, including the moderator, Rashid Rehman, were of the collective view that until Afghanistan fails to take responsibility of its action, it would be impossible to determine the future of the country. They said nothing can be predicted about the transition of power there, which should be held peacefully and the locals should be given a chance to decide their destiny.

Ahmed Rashid said Pakistan and Iran should stay out of the Afghan elections.

On the other hand, he said Pakistan should curtail its military to within the country’s borders and develop a national security strategy.

Khar also spoke saying Pakistan had not learnt its lesson from the past as far as relations with neighbouring countries were concerned, adding that nation building could not be dictated.

Furthermore, Nasr asked if Pakistan had the military capacity to defeat the Taliban?

He added that the dialogue between TTP and the government was not a solution and that the Taliban should understand that they did not have the upper hand. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

6:00 pm – 8:00 pm Sessions for the day have ended. Sachal Orchestra performance will begin at 8:00 pm. Watch this space for the pictures!

6:00 pm Afghanistan on the Brink

Key question is, does Pakistan has the military capacity to defeat TTP? – Vali Nasr

5:45 pm Afghanistan on the Brink

There's no proper national security strategy and the decision made in Islamabad are totally opaque. – Ahmed Rashid

5:30 pm Afghanistan on the Brink

Pakistan opposes the violent take of Taliban on Afghanistan. – Maleeha Lodhi

5:15 pm Afghanistan on the Brink

Let the internal dynamics of Afghanistan determine its future prospects. Nation building cannot be dictated. – Hina Rabbani Khar

5:03 pm The Making of Political Satire

In Pakistan, satire is laughing about tragedies because of the quality of leadership inflicted upon us. – Jugnu Mohsin

4:52 pm The Making of Political Satire

Increasing conspiracy theories is a tragedy. – Jugnu Mohsin

4:15 pm Fault-Lines across the Middle East

"Fault Lines across the Middle East" was one of the most talked about sessions as Vali Nasr focused on the most controversial issues that countries in the region are faced with. He said sectarian problems were on the rise and in some regions on their peak in the Middle East.

Nasr said the region’s Shias were resisting and demanding full citizen rights and Muslim citizens. He added that America did not care about Saudi Arabia but it was possible that it may shake hands with Iran. Nasr said Pakistan should not agitate Iran, as it would serve in the negative interests of the country in the long run.

Nasr said there was no doubt that extremists were recruiting people and training them. This scenario would badly affect the economic system in these countires. Conversing with Ahmed Rashid, Nasr said Pakistan needed to sort out its energy and other crises for which the country should get into an alliance with the right side. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

4:00 Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist International Film Director, Mira Nair and writer Mohsin Hamid, lead the audience through the entire journey of making The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

According to Hamid, it took him seven years to complete his monologue, which Nair later converted into a film script.

Nair revealed that most of the creative work on the film was done in Pakistan, but it was unfortunate that she could not shoot the film in Lahore.

Hamid added during the discussion that the strongest political thing about the movie is that people from different cultures came together for this project.

The project nearly fell apart twice due to the challenges faced during the production. However, Nair said, "Faiz Sahab's poetry gave me courage and that is the reason why I am here (in Lahore) today".

While going through the characters of the film, Nair said that the character of Changez depicts some personality traits of the writer.

Answering a question about the film, Hamid replied "Film made from my book, made me uncomfortable in the best possible way".

However, he also said that a film made out of his book was a dream come true. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

3:32 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

A film made from my book made me uncomfortable in the best possible way. – Mohsin Hamid

3:30 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Faiz's poetry is the reason I am home (Lahore). – Mira Nair

3:30 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Visitors attending the session. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
Visitors attending the session. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

3:28 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

The citizenship of Lahore is bigger than Pakistan. – Mohsin Hamid

3:15 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Strongest political thing I have come across is that people from differnet cultures came together and worked for this film. – Mohsin Hamid

3:15 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Lack of knowledge among the international writers challenged me to work on this script with Mohsin. – Mira Nair

3:00 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Mohsin Hamid. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
Mohsin Hamid. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

3:00 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

A reader of a book is a director of his own film. – Mohsin Hamid

2:45 pm Filming The Reluctant Fundamentalist

Mira Nair. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
Mira Nair. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

1:30pm Book Launch: A Small Fortune

Rosie Dastgir (R) with Kamila Shamsie. –Photo by Asif Umar
Rosie Dastgir (R) with Kamila Shamsie. –Photo by Asif Umar

12:40pm Reportage on Pakistan

The real battle will be fought on this side of the border - the narrative is being controlled by the progressive, which isn't necessarily in the majority - creating a sense of fear of being killed, which is the worst thing to happen, imposing this state of fear that stops people from talking. – Zahid Hussain

12:30pm Reportage on Pakistan

Journalism in Pakistan is the most interesting thing - the freedom you see now did not exist before. – Zahid Hussain

12:30pm An Equal Music: A Writer and his Other Arts

Someone once criticised that writing about music is like dancing about architecture. – Vikram Seth

12:23pm An Equal Music: A Writer and his Other Arts

Vikram Seth. –Photo by Asif Umar
Vikram Seth. –Photo by Asif Umar

12:15pm An Equal Music: A Writer and his Other Arts

I cannot live without music but I discovered my love for western music much later on in life. – Vikram Seth

11:45am Zia Mohyeddin Recites Mushtaq Yusafi

Zia Mohyeddin. –Photo by Asif Umar
Zia Mohyeddin. –Photo by Asif Umar

11:20am Angrezi Mushaira

Always read the poem aloud, you catch the deep emotion and feeling. – Jocelyn Ortt-Saeed

11:09am Politically Incorrect

People to people link between India and Pakistan is required. Culture alone cannot reduce the distance. – Shobhaa De´

11:06am Politically Incorrect

Sonia Gandhi should pack her bags as there is a time frame for every politician. – Shobhaa De´

11:03am Politically Incorrect

Everything looks positive but political forces are beyond us. – Shobhaa De´

10:50am Politically Incorrect

Shobhaa De.´ -Photo by Asif Umar
Shobhaa De.´ -Photo by Asif Umar

10:45am Beyond the Global Novel

I think the whole conversation for me has the fear of contamination of the outside world.there's a concern that our artists are being contaminated, but I think that's what artists need to thrive. – Mohsin Hamid

10:30am Beyond the Global Novel

I find the term 'global' interesting, presumably meaning the novelist is being globalised – Mohsin Hamid

10:15am Beyond the Global Novel

When people think of global novels they won't think they're reading something from where they are. – K. Anis Ahmed

10:00am We're now here at Alhamra Art Center for the second day of the Lahore Literary Festival. Morning sessions have just begun. Keep checking this space for live updates!

Lahore Literary Festival | 21st, 22nd & 23rd February | Alhamra Art Center
Lahore Literary Festival | 21st, 22nd & 23rd February | Alhamra Art Center

8:00 pm Dawn.com speaks to Gavin Francis, the author of 'Empire Antarctica'.

6:00 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

Tehmina Durrani. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
Tehmina Durrani. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

6:00 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

For me, blasphemy is the distortion of words of the Holy Quran and of the Prophet (PBUH) . – Tehmina Durrani

6:00 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

I was not scared of the shooting, but the public response. – Tehmina Durrani

6:00 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

Exile is the common thread in your life. – Rashed Rahman (about Tehmina Durrani)

5:50 pm War on Culture

Mishal Husain. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Mishal Husain. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

5:40 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

Rashed Rehman. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani
Rashed Rehman. – Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani

5:50 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

My childhood did not teach me anything – apart from the fact that my heart belonged to the 'other side'. – Tehmina Durrani

5:45 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

She walked in like a queen in exile – **Shobhaa De´, on Tehmina Durrani **

5:45 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

My book dignified me. – Tehmina Durrani

5:30 pm Happy Things in Sorrow Times

Tehmina Durrani. – Photo by Asif Umar
Tehmina Durrani. – Photo by Asif Umar

4:50 pm Dawn.com speaks to Julien Columeau

3:45 pm India, Cultural Conundrum?

Another popular session on the last day of the Lahore Literary Festival was, "India, Culture and Conundrum?"

Panelists included Aitzaz Ahsan, Sherry Rehman, Shobhaa De´ and Naseer.

Ahsan started the conversation with the concept of plurality and said, "We are not Arabs who don't believe in democracy so we must not forget our distinctness."

Adding to the conversation De´ said, "We are not territorial and we have never attacked any country for territory".

Rehman praised Pakistanis for having the ability to survive with every kind of situation, but questioned the intolerant nature of the locals. She envied that today's Muslims hardly act the way they used to in old times. Rehman raised the question of the safety Muslims in India, to which the Indian delegate Naseer added that today Muslims are in a better position as they are leaders, bureaucrats, cricketers etc.

He said that Hind–Muslim link is always limited to the India–Pakistan link.

Talking about Pakistani perception, Rehman said, "We never got to that point where we could have a dialogue with India.” She added that this can only happen when power is dispersed in the hands of the public; and civil society in India should also play a role.

Naseer added that currently India’s focus is on improving the economy, which will create a better scenario between the two countries. Whereas, Ahsan said, "We can't comment on what India should do, as Pakistan must first look into itself.” – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

Shobhaa De´ with Aitzaz Ahsan. – Photo by Asif Umar
Shobhaa De´ with Aitzaz Ahsan. – Photo by Asif Umar

3:35 pm

Intizar Hussain caught outside the hall, right after the session. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Intizar Hussain caught outside the hall, right after the session. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

3:30 pm Labyrinth of Reflections

Labyrinth of Reflection is a collection of illusions, which serves the conceptual purposes. – Rashid Rana

3:30 pm Book Launch: The Gift

Author, K. Anis Ahmed. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Author, K. Anis Ahmed. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

French author and journalist, Florence Noiville. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
French author and journalist, Florence Noiville. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

3:15 pm Hamara Culture aur Bairuni Asarat

Khaled Ahmed. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Khaled Ahmed. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

Masud Ashar. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Masud Ashar. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

3:00 pm Women on the Verge...

From L to R: Libby Owen-Edmunds, Florence Noville and Namita Gokhale. – Photo by Asif Umar
From L to R: Libby Owen-Edmunds, Florence Noville and Namita Gokhale. – Photo by Asif Umar

From L to R: Alex Von Tunzelmann, Manju Kapur and Shobhaa De´. – Photo by Asif Umar
From L to R: Alex Von Tunzelmann, Manju Kapur and Shobhaa De´. – Photo by Asif Umar

3:00 pm Hamara Culture aur Bairuni Asarat

Fahmida Riaz. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Fahmida Riaz. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

Asif Farrukhi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Asif Farrukhi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

Intizar Hussain.  – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Intizar Hussain. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

2:25 pm

Visitors outside a hall during lunch break. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Visitors outside a hall during lunch break. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

2:00 pm

Mohsin Hamid caught outside in the garden at Alhamra Art Center. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Mohsin Hamid caught outside in the garden at Alhamra Art Center. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch Break Sessions resume at 2:30 pm. Stay with us for updates from the afternoon sessions!

1:30 pm Love in the Season of Mangoes

I live in Pakistan, it's as dangerous as it gets for the outside eye. – Mohammed Hanif

1:25 pm Love in the Season of Mangoes

Mohammed Hanif. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Mohammed Hanif. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

1:20 pm The Rise and Fall of Masala Films

Amitabh is an icon, he gave dignity to his characters, to Indian cinema and India itself . – Rachel Dwyer

1:15 pm Book Launch: A God in Every Stone

Kamila Shamsie (L) with Alex von Tunzelmann
Kamila Shamsie (L) with Alex von Tunzelmann

1:00 pm The Rise and Fall of Masala Films

Rachel Dwyer. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Rachel Dwyer. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

12:45 pm The Rise and Fall of Masala Films

If Hollywood can make unrealistic films like Gravity, then Dabang makes sense. – Rachel Dwyer

12:45 pm The Rise and Fall of Masala Films

Rachel Dwyer (R) with Mira Hashmi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Rachel Dwyer (R) with Mira Hashmi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

12:15 pm Book Launch: Bird in a Banyan Tree

My worst stigma was going to jail, India misjudged me at first. – Bina Ramani

12:10 pm A view from the Himalayas “A view from the Himalayas” was a beautiful journey through the eyes of Gavin Francis, Libby Owen – Edmunds, Namita Gokhale and Vikram Seth.

Speakers stunned the audience with the description of the cultures and life around the heavenly mountains.

The pictorial display of the Himalayas by Francis left everyone in awe. He shared his experience, that his life in the Arctic motivated him to explore the other side of the world.

Edmunds also shared her research on living in South Asia for thirteen years, and her study on the life in Baltistan. She urged the locals of Pakistan to visit the northern areas at least once in their lifetime.

Gokhale, who herself lived all her life in the mountains, described the damages that have occurred in these areas and discussed the ecology of the area. She also shared how music is an essential part of the mountains, as women sing specific tunes and raags on flute and other local instruments.

Seth focused on the influence of the Chinese culture on the Himalayan ranges and people, and emphasized the need for development in that area.

Other panelists believed that roads and buildings have deeply affected the serene beauty of the mountain ranges.

The session ended with the beautiful words of Seth, who spent his childhood in these mountains, “Himalayas give you breathing space, beauty and silence.” – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

12:10 pm A view from the Himalayas

I see the Himalayas as breath, expanse and silence. – Vikram Seth

12:10 pm A view from the Himalayas

Gavin Francis. – Photo by Asif Umar
Gavin Francis. – Photo by Asif Umar

12:03 pm A view from the Himalayas

I am a typical looking doctor by profession, so it's unusual for people to accept me as an explorer. – Gavin Francis

12:00 pm Naguib Mahfouz: The Cairo Trilogy in Egypt Today

Dealing in translation, Mahfooz's works really trickled down to a deeper level. – Samia Mehrez

11:50 am Book Launch: Bird in a Banyan Tree Bina Ramani in conversation with Sehyr Saigol

Sehyr Saigol. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Sehyr Saigol. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

Bina Ramani. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Bina Ramani. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

11:45 am Naguib Mahfouz: The Cairo Trilogy in Egypt Today

Samia Mehrez with Hugh Eakin. – Photo by Asif Umar
Samia Mehrez with Hugh Eakin. – Photo by Asif Umar

11:30 am The Place of Fiction in a Non-fiction World

Panelists from the session. – Photo by Asif Umar
Panelists from the session. – Photo by Asif Umar

11:15 am Humour as Subvertor One of the first sessions of the third day of the Lahore Literary Festival was "Humour as Subvertor", which as the name suggests, made the audience laugh throughout. Panelists were Salima Hashmi, Muhammad Hanif and Salman Shahid, who discussed the dying Punjabi language; and commented on how humour is taken as vulgarity.

Adding to the discussion, Hanif said, "I have lived all my life among maraasis, and that has been inculcated in my blood.

At the end of the session, Ali Aftab Syed from 'Beygairat Brigade ' sang a verse from his song, which was the cherry on top. – Text by Maryiam Pervaiz

11:15 am Humour as Subvertor

Salima Hashmi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema
Salima Hashmi. – Photo by Hamza Cheema

10:50 am Humour as Subvertor

Mohammed Hanif. – Photo by Asif Umar
Mohammed Hanif. – Photo by Asif Umar

10:40 am Punjab ke Inquilabi Shuara (Poetry of Resistance)

Panelists from the session. – Photo by Asif Umar
Panelists from the session. – Photo by Asif Umar

10:30 am Imagining Cities

From L to R: Shahid Zahid, Raza Rumi and Amit Chaudhuri. – Photo by Asif Umar
From L to R: Shahid Zahid, Raza Rumi and Amit Chaudhuri. – Photo by Asif Umar

10:00 am Good morning, everyone! Hope you're all having a wonderful Sunday morning.

We're here once again at Alhamra Art Center for the third and the final day of the Lahore Literary Festival. Morning sessions are underway and we can hear loud cheers from the nearby halls.

Stay with us for live updates of the sessions with pictures and quotes!

Dawn.com's KLF team

Aliraza Khatri

Asif Umar

Bilal Mazhar

Fatema Imani

Hammad Abbasi

Kurt Menezes

Mahjabeen Mankani

Mahnoor Sherazee

Muhammad Umar

Qurat ul ain Choudhry

Soonha Abro

Suhail Yusuf

Tahira Booya

Zainul Abideen Siddiqui


Comments (2) Closed

Khurshid Anwer Feb 21, 2014 06:32pm

I am looking forward to the book launching of 'A small fortune' by Rosie Dastgir, about a man torn between two worlds, his present one and the one he thought he had left behind, and trying in vain to meet the demands of both

Shahpur Feb 22, 2014 05:45am

Dawn provides a very good view of Pakistan. It is not all Talibans and Karachi, but there is something else also, going on. On the other hand not every one in Lahore can get into Alhambra, on the Mall, how ordinary people of Lahore are doing.