25 July, 2014 / Ramazan 26, 1435

Watching the slowly moving planet Venus against the solar disk is a historical and joyful experience.

Like other parts of the world, astronomy enthusiasts gathered in different cities of Pakistan to watch the spectacular sky show of the Venus transit, which will not happen again for another 105 years or until 2117.

Students, enthusiasts, media persons and faculty members gathered at the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA) at Karachi University to watch the spectacular Venus transit. ISPA is located at the hillock near Silver Jubilee gate of the university.

The institute set two telescopes to facilitate the observation of the once-in-a-lifetime celestial event. One small telescope was put on a tripod, while the other was imported from Germany in 1960s and is installed inside a dome on top of the building.

Early morning the Sun appeared on Pakistan’s horizon with a black dot, which was Venus, travelling along the solar disk for many hours.

Although, the cloudy sky dampered the view of the event, people watched the transit whenever the sun was visible in between moving clouds.

According to a PhD student of the institute, the event was observed till 9: 40 am.

Venus is dubbed as the Romans Goddess of Love and also known as the Evening or Morning Star. It rotates in the opposite direction to other planets where the norm is for the Sun to rise from the west and set in the East.

Unlike Solar and Lunar eclipses, the Venus transit is rare phenomena. Only six transits have ever been recorded in the human history.

- Text by Suhail Yusuf/Dawn.com, photos by Dawn.com and Agencies

Students of the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA) at the Karachi University look up at the sky to see Venus travelling over the sun. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
Students of the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA) at the Karachi University look up at the sky to see Venus travelling over the sun. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
Rashid Ibrahim, a Ph.D student at ISPA looks through a telescope hoping to catch the the Venus transit on a cloudy day in Karachi. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
Rashid Ibrahim, a Ph.D student at ISPA looks through a telescope hoping to catch the the Venus transit on a cloudy day in Karachi. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
The observatory telescope at the the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA) in Karachi pointing towards the sun as the transit of Venus occurs. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
The observatory telescope at the the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA) in Karachi pointing towards the sun as the transit of Venus occurs. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
A visitor photographs a live image of Venus moving past the sun showing through a coelostat at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. ? Photo by AP
A visitor photographs a live image of Venus moving past the sun showing through a coelostat at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. ? Photo by AP
The planet Venus can be seen on its transit of the Sun, from New Delhi June 6, 2012. Venus last made a visible pass in front of the sun in 2004 but will not make another visible transit until 2117. - Photo by Reuters
The planet Venus can be seen on its transit of the Sun, from New Delhi June 6, 2012. Venus last made a visible pass in front of the sun in 2004 but will not make another visible transit until 2117. - Photo by Reuters
A bird comes in to land atop one of the domes of the landmark Taj Mahal as Venus, top left, begins to pass in front of the sun, as visible from Agra, India, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. ? Photo by AP
A bird comes in to land atop one of the domes of the landmark Taj Mahal as Venus, top left, begins to pass in front of the sun, as visible from Agra, India, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. ? Photo by AP
Handout image courtesy of NASA shows the planet Venus transiting the Sun, June 5, 2012. One of the rarest astronomical events occurs on Tuesday and Wednesday when Venus passes directly between the sun and Earth, a transit that won't occur again until 2117. ? Photo by NASA/Reuters
Handout image courtesy of NASA shows the planet Venus transiting the Sun, June 5, 2012. One of the rarest astronomical events occurs on Tuesday and Wednesday when Venus passes directly between the sun and Earth, a transit that won't occur again until 2117. ? Photo by NASA/Reuters
The black dot on the sun shows Venus as it travels across the sun in Karachi. - Photo by  Mahjabeen Mankani/Dawn.com
The black dot on the sun shows Venus as it travels across the sun in Karachi. - Photo by Mahjabeen Mankani/Dawn.com
A visitor at ISPA looks at the sun from their observatory in Karachi. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
A visitor at ISPA looks at the sun from their observatory in Karachi. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
The sun appears as a fiery orange dot through the eyepiece of the telescope at ISPA. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com
The sun appears as a fiery orange dot through the eyepiece of the telescope at ISPA. - Photo by Sara Faruqi/Dawn.com

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