Silhouetted against vehicle
Silhouetted against vehicle's headlights, people walk on a street darkened by power cuts on the outskirts of Islamabad.
During a power cut Pakistanis gather outside to escape the heat trapped in their homes while a street barber gives a customer a haircut in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
During a power cut Pakistanis gather outside to escape the heat trapped in their homes while a street barber gives a customer a haircut in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
Pakistani youths enjoy a ride at a makeshift entertainment park set up outside a shrine in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
Pakistani youths enjoy a ride at a makeshift entertainment park set up outside a shrine in Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
A resident climbs on a pole to adjust an illegal power connection from the transmission line on the outskirts of Karachi.
A resident climbs on a pole to adjust an illegal power connection from the transmission line on the outskirts of Karachi.
A woman cooks for her family using a fire inside her makeshift home in Islamabad.
A woman cooks for her family using a fire inside her makeshift home in Islamabad.
Employees work at a textile factory partially run by privately-produced power in Faisalabad.
Employees work at a textile factory partially run by privately-produced power in Faisalabad.
A worker uses a sewing machine at a textile factory that is partially run by privately-produced power in Faisalabad.
A worker uses a sewing machine at a textile factory that is partially run by privately-produced power in Faisalabad.
A barber shaves a customer
A barber shaves a customer's beard by the light of a candle and a mobile phone, during a power outage in Islamabad.
Textile workers wait for the electricity to return at a factory in Faisalabad.
Textile workers wait for the electricity to return at a factory in Faisalabad.
Fruit and food vendors use gas lamps to light their carts while waiting for customers outside a hospital on a dark roadside in Islamabad.
Fruit and food vendors use gas lamps to light their carts while waiting for customers outside a hospital on a dark roadside in Islamabad.
Textile worker Mohammad Yousaf, waits for power to return at a loom factory in Faisalabad.
Textile worker Mohammad Yousaf, waits for power to return at a loom factory in Faisalabad.
Patients rest in their beds during a power outage at a hospital in Gujar Khan. Dr. Ashraf Nizami of the Pakistan Medical Association said that doctors are seeing more psychological effects of load-shedding. "It is a torture for the medical community and the patients," he said.
Patients rest in their beds during a power outage at a hospital in Gujar Khan. Dr. Ashraf Nizami of the Pakistan Medical Association said that doctors are seeing more psychological effects of load-shedding. "It is a torture for the medical community and the patients," he said.
A Christian woman works in her kitchen during a power cut at her home in Islamabad. Power can be out for up to 20 hours a day in the summer.
A Christian woman works in her kitchen during a power cut at her home in Islamabad. Power can be out for up to 20 hours a day in the summer.
Shahla Ashiq uses a hand fan to cool off her daughter, Momina, 2, during a power outage at a hospital in Gujar Khan.
Shahla Ashiq uses a hand fan to cool off her daughter, Momina, 2, during a power outage at a hospital in Gujar Khan.
Workers take a smoke break as they dismantle loom machines in Faisalabad, to sell as scrap metal at a textile factory which closed due to power shortages. Kurram Mukhtar, head of Sadaqat Limited, one of Pakistan
Workers take a smoke break as they dismantle loom machines in Faisalabad, to sell as scrap metal at a textile factory which closed due to power shortages. Kurram Mukhtar, head of Sadaqat Limited, one of Pakistan's leading textile manufacturers, said that from 2006 to 2010 many companies in the city and surrounding area were bankrupted by the power crisis. Owners who survived decided they needed energy independence.

Power outages have become a way of life in Pakistan, affecting everything from employment, to medical care and how many times households, unable to keep food cool in a refrigerator, go to the grocery store.

Hundreds of loom factories have also closed down due to the interruptions. Power can be out for up to 20 hours a day in the summer in most areas.

Published Jun 17, 2013 01:36pm

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Comments (12) (Closed)


Aamir
Jun 17, 2013 10:28pm

Excellent photographs...however name of the photographer is missing..?

rana1
Jun 17, 2013 10:49pm

their is a lot of benefit if pakistan would go back to the old days of oil lamp. 1.with no light there is less chances of going out to waste money on the never ending shoppings. 2. wastage of power on wedding halls e.t.c whereas functions will be held in limited time 3.reduction in crime as most of the goons will opt to remain in the house until the day electricity is back. 4. use of internet filth that corrupts the mind will be less available. 5.heat generated by machines e.g air condioners e.t.c will become zero which obviously will lower the outsude temperatures.6.less interference with what others are doing as it will keep the people busy within themselves just as it did long long ago..7..those who can afford to buy petrol or gas powered generators are few and other pakistanis can always look upto them and say to themselves,"ameero ki kya baat hae" just as our forefathers did who looked upto the kinglys and the nawabs etc

Ravi Ingale from University of Pune
Jun 18, 2013 10:29am

China is Pakistan's "JIGARI DOST" so China should help Pakistan in their Energy crisis.

Hassan Jamil
Jun 18, 2013 02:02pm

"A way of life".........hahahaha........It is our life style now. We are already in the stone age. The stone age was better than our ones as the caves were cooler and there was no tension for power outage. Also the people were taking their sleep in the normal way and they were not waiting on the street for the light, I mean power to come. Our present and previous governments are only passing time. There is no solution with them for this huge problem. General Musharraf was fool, who came under pressure from the Americans for sending us in the stone age..................the age, we are celebrating.

Riaz Khan
Jun 18, 2013 04:29pm

Only fortunate ones are tested by Allah! We should be grateful to Allah for testing not only Pakistanis but all Muslim Ummah since last 1400 years. Remember only Allah's beloved & fortunate ones are tested.

fakfra
Jun 18, 2013 05:28pm

Why did you have to say a christan woman? A woman! I didnt see a comment 'a Muslim woman does etc etc'

Akki
Jun 18, 2013 11:14pm

@Hassan Jamil: same in india

gangadin
Jun 18, 2013 11:15pm

@rana1: Well done. For the first time I see a sensible reply.

jeet
Jun 19, 2013 12:17am

Dil Khush ho gaya. We want Pakistan like this.Mera Bharat Mahan

MAlvi
Jun 19, 2013 01:32pm

@Hassan Jamil: How Musharraf is responsible for the present power crisis? He tried to have Kalabag dam built, which was supposed to produce electrity and supply water for irrigation. The politicians have opposed it from the beginning.

MAlvi
Jun 19, 2013 01:37pm

@rana1: I agree. Pakistan should forget about electric power. Not only because of the listed advantages, but because of the fact that Pakistan cannot solve this problem, any way.

Talat
Jun 19, 2013 04:48pm

We have been cheated by our times Mir Jafar and Mir Sadiq...