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CORRECTION: Due to an error on the part of the agency/client of this sponsored content, an earlier version of this article incorrectly attributed the post to WWF-Pakistan in the text and in the written disclaimer at the bottom. This error is deeply regretted as this article and its views on wildlife conservation and sustainable hunting are in no way reflective of, or associated with WWF-Pakistan.


The markhor is the national animal of Pakistan. —Creative commons
The markhor is the national animal of Pakistan. —Creative commons

Nature has so graciously endowed Pakistan with rare species such as the markhor in Kohistan, the dolphins in the Indus River and the desert gazelle in Cholistan — all of whom are a threatened species in their home.

The increasing deforestation, erratic climate changes, pollution and hunting all pose a risk to Pakistan’s wildlife. And just like in matters of governance, the government hasn’t done enough.

The evidence is in the blackbuck, black bear of Balochistan and the Indian Gazelle, which are officially extinct.

Once found across Pakistan, the black bear is now only confined to wetter, forested areas. It is largely hunted for fat which is used to treat many illnesses by the locals. —Creative commons
Once found across Pakistan, the black bear is now only confined to wetter, forested areas. It is largely hunted for fat which is used to treat many illnesses by the locals. —Creative commons

Despite coming under fire from conservationists on many occasions for failing to enforce hunting regulations, the trend continues on with impunity.

Unaware of the benefits of conservation, locals, for a quick buck, assist huntsmen in the criminal act. Owing to Wildlife Conservation Pakistan's efforts, the rapid decline of the houbara bustard over the last two decades has reduced to some extent.

Take a look: Houbara bustards: An annual massacre of national pride

There is an urgent and real need to ensure the conservation of Pakistan's wildlife — the already incurred damage is incontestable.

Pakistan's blind Indus River dolphins are under threat from a combination of uncontrolled fishing and damage to its habitat caused by man-made dams. —AFP
Pakistan's blind Indus River dolphins are under threat from a combination of uncontrolled fishing and damage to its habitat caused by man-made dams. —AFP

A mutal collaboration between the government and local communities appears to be the surest way of saving our wildlife from extinction. To prevent locals from poaching activities, monetary incentives and limits should be provided to their hunts.

Last year's intense heatwave killed six blackbucks at the Karachi zoo. —Creative commons
Last year's intense heatwave killed six blackbucks at the Karachi zoo. —Creative commons

While a ban on hunting is whispered among the preservation circles, it could well prove to be a disastrous move as foreign hunters may pursue hunting expeditions in other countries, leading to a decline in the economy, with locals going right back to hunting, the illegal way.

The solution? Sustainable hunting.

Illegal hunting is threatening the existence of 'chinakara', a beautiful antelope species of the Indian gazelle. —Creative commons
Illegal hunting is threatening the existence of 'chinakara', a beautiful antelope species of the Indian gazelle. —Creative commons

To counter the difficulty of not losing all our species to hunting, a quota for the hunting of the specie, as per its sustainability level.

Our country hosts some of the most biologically diverse flora, its time we gave this heritage its due respect.



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