Truss makes U-turn on pay plan in first big misstep

Published August 3, 2022
<p>Conservative leadership candidate Liz Truss speaks during a hustings event, part of the Conservative party leadership campaign, in Exeter, Britain, August 1. — Reuters</p>

Conservative leadership candidate Liz Truss speaks during a hustings event, part of the Conservative party leadership campaign, in Exeter, Britain, August 1. — Reuters

LONDON: Britain’s foreign minister Liz Truss, the frontrunner to replace Boris Johnson as prime minister, was forced to backtrack on one of her most striking pledges a day after announcing it following a backlash from fellow Conservatives and opposition parties.

In the first big misstep of her campaign, Truss set out plans to save billions of pounds a year in government spending in a pledge opponents said would require cutting the pay of public sector workers, including nurses and teachers, outside of the wealthy southeast of England.

Truss had said late on Monday she would introduce regional pay boards rather than having a national pay agreement, tailoring pay to the cost of living where people actually work.

But after criticism on Tuesday, Truss said: “I never had any intention of changing the terms and conditions of teachers and nurses. But what I want to be clear about is I will not be going ahead with the regional pay boards.” The U-turn came as a poll showed Truss with a smaller lead over her rival Rishi Sunak than previously thought.

A survey of 807 Conservative Party members by Italian data company Techne carried out July 19-27 found Truss was backed by 48pc, compared with 43pc for former finance minister Sunak.

The result suggests a much tighter race than a previous poll of Conservative members carried out by YouGov on July 20-21, which gave Truss a 24-point lead over Sunak.

Truss’s public sector pay plan had faced criticism from the main opposition Labour Party and some Conservative lawmakers.

The Conservatives won the biggest majority in three decades at the 2019 national election by upending conventional British politics and winning in more industrial areas in central and northern England with a pledge to reduce regional inequalities.

Published in Dawn, August 3rd, 2022

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