ISLAMABAD: Adviser to the National Command Authority on Nuclear Power Dr Ansar Parvez has cautioned against lowering priority for nuclear energy in the power generation mix and has called for expanding its share to at least 20 per cent of the electricity generation capacity.

Dr Parvez, who has previously headed Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), was speaking to participants of a webinar organised by the Strategic Vision Institute (SVI) titled ‘Pakistan’s Energy Security and Role of Nuclear Technology’.

Underscoring the importance of nuclear energy, he said it should continue to play an important role in the generation mix as it was cheap, reliable and had a higher productive capacity factor.

Dr Parvez suggested increasing the share of nuclear energy in the generation mix from the current 8pc to at least 20pc.

His contention was that nuclear plants unlike most of the other generation sources are baseload plants that produce electricity at a constant rate to meet the continuous demand. “Once 20pc of your capacity is on secure baseload, you can build as many of solar, wind, and hydel plants,” he said.

Pakistan currently has an installed nuclear capacity of 2,490 MW, which would next year grow to 3,635 MW with the addition of a 1,145 MW K-3 plant. No further growth in this capacity is expected till 2030 as no other nuclear power plant is currently under construction.

He suggested that solar, wind and other renewables were being prioritised in the national planning as they are cheap.

Dr Parvez, emphasising the significance of energy planning said it has a direct bearing on economic security, environmental security and national security.

Another expert Dr Zafar Ali said Pakistan accords utmost importance to nuclear security and technology regulations as a national responsibility. Over the years, he said, Pakistan has established a comprehensive and effective national nuclear regulatory regime, which covers nuclear material and other radioactive materials and associated activities.

He said that the regulatory arrangements while preventing proliferation of weapons of mass destruction should not hamper international cooperation in the peaceful uses of technology. A non-discriminatory approach towards civilian nuclear cooperation, he added, will not only benefit the global non-proliferation regime but also help in achieving the United Nations sustainable goals.

Published in Dawn, December 15th, 2021

Opinion

Editorial

Another U-turn?
Updated 07 Oct, 2022

Another U-turn?

The PTI’s decision to take back its resignations could herald a twist in the tussle playing out in Islamabad.
Renewed TTP threat
07 Oct, 2022

Renewed TTP threat

THE interior ministry’s call for ‘extreme vigilance’ and instructions to security forces to conduct ‘search...
Women’s gala in GB
07 Oct, 2022

Women’s gala in GB

REGRESSIVE forces, once again, nearly had their way — this time in Gilgit-Baltistan. A three-day sporting gala for...
‘Draconian’ law
06 Oct, 2022

‘Draconian’ law

THE debate over what it means to be ‘sadiq’ and ‘ameen’ has reignited after the incumbent Supreme Court ...
Welcome clarity
Updated 06 Oct, 2022

Welcome clarity

There needs to be consensus amongst all political actors that matters of governance should be the exclusive domain of civilians.
Car purchases
06 Oct, 2022

Car purchases

IF we are in the market to buy a new car, we end up paying a significantly large amount as premium over the sticker...