Alert Sign Dear reader, online ads enable us to deliver the journalism you value. Please support us by taking a moment to turn off Adblock on Dawn.com.

Alert Sign Dear reader, please upgrade to the latest version of IE to have a better reading experience

.

Tens of thousands in HK take message to mainland

July 08, 2019

Email

HONG KONG: Protesters march to a train station in this city’s tourism district.—Reuters
HONG KONG: Protesters march to a train station in this city’s tourism district.—Reuters

HONG KONG: Tens of thousands of people, many wearing black shirts and some carrying British colonial-era flags, marched in Hong Kong on Sunday, targeting a mainland Chinese audience as a month-old protest movement showed no signs of abating.

Chanting “Free Hong Kong” and words of encouragement to their fellow citizens, wave after wave of demonstrators streamed by a shopping district popular with mainland visitors on a march to the high-speed railway station that connects the semi-autonomous Chinese territory to Guangdong and other mainland cities.

Hong Kong has been riven by huge marches and sometimes disruptive protests for the past month, sparked by proposed changes to extradition laws that would have allowed suspects to be sent to the mainland to face trial. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam suspended the bill and apologised for how it was handled, but protesters want it to be formally withdrawn and for Lam to resign.

Organisers said 230,000 people marched on Sunday, while police estimated the crowd at 56,000.

“We want to show our peaceful, graceful protest to the mainland visitors because the information is rather blocked in mainland,” march organiser Ventus Lau said. “We want to show them the true image and the message of Hong Kongers,” Chinese media have not covered the protests widely, focusing on clashes with police and damage to public property.

As the crowd broke up Sunday night, a few hundred remained and taunted police who had retreated behind huge barriers set up outside the railway station, while others moved to Canton Road, a street lined with luxury boutique stores.

The march was the first major action since two simultaneous protests last Monday, the 22nd anniversary of the July 1, 1997, return of Hong Kong from Britain to China.

One of those protests, a massive march through central Hong Kong, drew hundreds of thousands of people. It was overshadowed, however, by an assault on the legislature building by a few hundred demonstrators, who shattered thick glass walls to get in and then wreaked havoc for three hours, spray painting slogans on the walls, overturning furniture and damaging electronic voting and fire prevention systems.

Sunday’s march was the first protest against the extradition legislation on the Kowloon side of Hong Kong harbour. The previous ones were on Hong Kong Island, the city’s business and government centre.

Many of the marchers were young, wearing black shirts that have become the uniform of the protesters. The largely peaceful crowd also included older people carrying hand-held fans in the muggy heat, as well as parents with children, including some in baby strollers.

Many held placards, including one that read “Extradite to China, disappear forever.” Some carried the British flag or the old Hong Kong flag from when it was a British colony.

“This is our fourth march because we think this government is not taking care of Hong Kong,” said Dan Lee, who joined with his wife and their three children. “We need to save Hong Kong and we need to come out for our future generations.” The extradition legislation has raised concerns about an erosion of freedoms and rights in Hong Kong, which was guaranteed its own legal system for 50 years after its return to China in 1997.

Prior to the march, police put up large barricades blocking a main entrance to the railway station to prevent any attempt to enter it.

Published in Dawn, July 8th, 2019