India, New Zealand share points as World Cup fixture called off at Trent Bridge

Updated June 13, 2019

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Indian fans at Trent Bridge wait for World Cup fixture between India and New Zealand to begin,. The match has been delayed due to rain. — Reuters
Indian fans at Trent Bridge wait for World Cup fixture between India and New Zealand to begin,. The match has been delayed due to rain. — Reuters
Groundstaff at Trent Bridge put covers on the pitch as rain delays World Cup match between India and New Zealand. — Reuters
Groundstaff at Trent Bridge put covers on the pitch as rain delays World Cup match between India and New Zealand. — Reuters

Inclement English weather claimed yet another World Cup match after India's group game against 2015 finalists New Zealand was called off without a ball being bowled at Trent Bridge on Thursday.

A soggy outfield from overnight showers had already delayed the start of the contest between the tournament's only two unbeaten sides.

Also read: Fans lash out at ICC as rain plays spoilsport at World Cup

Umpires Marais Erasmus and Paul Reiffel carried out almost hourly inspections in intermittent drizzle before finally throwing in the towel in the afternoon.

This was the fourth match to be either called off or abandoned in the rain-hit tournament with many questioning the absence of reserve days for group matches.

New Zealand top the table with seven points, two ahead of India who have played one game fewer.

After fresh rain started falling a while earlier, groundstaff stood by as further drainage was no longer possible. A pitch inspection has been scheduled for 3pm (local time), according to ESPN Cricinfo, after which it would be decided if the teams can still play a Twenty20 game.

Tournament organisers have faced criticism after two washouts and one no result, forcing teams to share one point each.

After their fixture against Sri Lanka in Bristol was abandoned without a ball being bowled, Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes said: “We put men on the moon, so why can't we have a reserve day?"

ICC chief executive David Richardson said factoring in a reserve day for every match would be “extremely complex to deliver”.

Earlier, speaking about his team's momentum, Indian Captain Virat Kohli said his job is simple: When India is fielding, he merely chooses which team-mate bowls next and lets them rip.

The formula has worked impressively in the World Cup against Australia and South Africa, so far.

New Zealand, on the other hand, have limited Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan to fewer than 250 runs each, and overcome all of them batting second.

The Black Caps pulled off the same trick in the warm-up match against India last month at The Oval.

Trent Boult and Jimmy Neesham took seven wickets in bowling out India in 40 overs, then Ross Taylor and Kane Williamson defied India to bat New Zealand home with 13 overs to spare.

The result heartened New Zealand, while India swept it under the carpet as just a warm-up.