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Rains send wave of fear among wheat growers

Updated April 17, 2019

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The rain in the twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad on Tuesday caused concern among farmers about possible damages to their wheat crops. — White Star
The rain in the twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad on Tuesday caused concern among farmers about possible damages to their wheat crops. — White Star

RAWALPINDI: The rain in the twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad on Tuesday caused concern among farmers about possible damages to their wheat crops.

The rain brought down the maximum temperature from 29 to 26°C in the capital and from 29 to 25°C in Rawalpindi.

The Meteorological Department recorded 35mm rain in Zero Point, 43mm at Saidpur in Islamabad; 17mm in Shamsabad and 5mm at Chaklala in Rawalpindi.

An official of the Met Office said a westerly wave was affecting most upper and central parts of the country and likely to persist in the upper parts till Wednesday night.

He said widespread dust-thunderstorm/rain accompanied by gusty winds were expected in Punjab, Islamabad, Kashmir, at scattered places in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and at isolated places in Quetta, Zhob, Sibbi, Kalat, Sukkur, Larkana divisions and Gilgit-Baltistan.

Hailstorm is also expected at a few places during the period. Isolated heavy falls may occur in Malakand, Hazara divisions and Kashmir.

There are also chances of hailstorms in some parts of the areas near Rawalpindi and Islamabad.

“There was no rain in some areas of the twin cities, including Golra, Bokra and near the Islamabad International Airport. But there are chances of rain in these areas on Wednesday,” the official said.

The farmers in surrounding areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad feared that the rain may spoil their crops.

“The wheat crop is fully grown and strong winds could lay down the standup crops and heavy showers or hailstorm spoil the wheat,” said Mohammad Ramzan, a landowner in Rawat.

Published in Dawn, April 17th, 2019