PPP questions legitimacy of talks

Published February 8, 2014
The former minister also questioned links between religious parties, including Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) and the Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam (JUI-F), with the TTP and said that the JI and the JUI-F were registered political parties which could not function outside the purview of the constitution. — File photo
The former minister also questioned links between religious parties, including Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) and the Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam (JUI-F), with the TTP and said that the JI and the JUI-F were registered political parties which could not function outside the purview of the constitution. — File photo

ISLAMABAD: Former interior minister and PPP Senator Rehman Malik has questioned the legal and constitutional status of peace talks with Taliban and asked the government to clarify its position on Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan’s demand to remove it from the list of banned organisations.

“Aren’t we violating the law and the constitution by holding talks with a banned organisation? What will happen if tomorrow someone goes to the Supreme Court?” asked Mr Malik while speaking on a point of order in Senate on Friday.

He said that under Section 11 of the Anti-Terrorism Act 1997, talks could not be held with outlawed outfits.

“Sections 11A and 11B clearly say that you can’t sit and talk with banned organisations,” he said.

The former minister also questioned links between religious parties, including Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) and the Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam (JUI-F), with the TTP and said that the JI and the JUI-F were registered political parties which could not function outside the purview of the constitution.

According to the former interior minister, history showed that Taliban had always regrouped and reorganised themselves during the dialogue process and captured Swat and Malakand after reaching agreements in 2005 and 2006.

“Isn’t it so that Taliban want to occupy certain parts of the country after entering into another agreement,” he asked.

The PPP senator also called for making public the terms of reference of the negotiating committees.

He also asked Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to take parliament into confidence on talks with Taliban.

Opinion

Editorial

Hard reset
25 Nov, 2022

Hard reset

IT is done. What should have been a routine matter in simpler times had this year become a vortex that seemingly...
Order of precedence
25 Nov, 2022

Order of precedence

IN Pakistan as well as abroad, there are few illusions about who actually calls the shots in this country. This...
Politicised police
25 Nov, 2022

Politicised police

AN important case is being heard at the Supreme Court these days, whose outcome could have a far-reaching impact on ...
Farewell to arms
Updated 24 Nov, 2022

Farewell to arms

The good general failed to tell us what motivated his institution to quit politics in his last year in power.
Currency crisis
24 Nov, 2022

Currency crisis

NOMURA, a top financial services company based in Japan, has included Pakistan among seven countries threatened by a...
Privilege and policing
24 Nov, 2022

Privilege and policing

POOR policing and privilege collided in what could have been an entirely preventable tragedy. A young man — a...