TTP to launch wave of revenge attacks in Pakistan

Published November 8, 2013
“We will target security forces, government installations, political leaders and police,” Asmatullah Shaheen, head of the shura and caretaker leader of the TTP, told Reuters by telephone from an undisclosed location.  — File Photo by AFP
“We will target security forces, government installations, political leaders and police,” Asmatullah Shaheen, head of the shura and caretaker leader of the TTP, told Reuters by telephone from an undisclosed location. — File Photo by AFP

DERA ISMAIL KHAN: The Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) announced on Friday they would orchestrate a wave of revenge attacks against the government after naming hardline commander Mullah Fazlullah as their new leader.

The rise of Fazlullah, who is known for his ruthless reputation and rejection of peace talks, by the Taliban shura (leadership council) a day earlier, follows the killing of the outlawed outfit’s previous leader Hakimullah Mehsud in a US drone strike on Nov 1.

“We will target security forces, government installations, political leaders and police,” Asmatullah Shaheen, head of the shura and caretaker leader of the TTP, told Reuters by telephone from an undisclosed location.

He said the Taliban's main target included army and government installations in Punjab province, the political stronghold of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.

“We have a plan. But I want to make one thing clear. We will not target civilians, bazaars or public places. People do not need to be afraid,” Shaheen added.

Pakistan publicly condemns US drone strikes as a breach of its sovereignty but in private officials admit the government broadly supports them. Militants are mainly holed up in remote areas on the Pak-Afghan border where the army has no presence.

“Pakistan has full information about drone attacks,” said Shaheen. “Pakistan is a slave of America. It is an American colony.”

The Pakistani Taliban are fighting to topple the government and impose Sharia rule in the nuclear-armed nation.

Attacks have been on the rise since Sharif came to power in May, a concern for global powers already unnerved by the possible security implications of the planned withdrawal of most US-led troops from neighbouring Afghanistan in 2014.

Mehsud and his allies had been tentatively open to the concept of ceasefire talks with the government, but Fazlullah, whose men had claimed responsibility for the attack on the schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai last year and the Dir attack in September this year which had killed Major General Sanaullah Niazi and Lieutenant Colonel Touseef, strongly opposes any negotiations.

No meaningful talks have taken place since Sharif's election and Fazlullah's rise could signal the start of a new period of uncertainty and violence in the already unstable region.

The Pakistani Taliban have links with al Qaeda and are also allied with, but separate from, the Afghan Taliban.

Opinion

Editorial

Is there a plan?
Updated 06 Dec, 2022

Is there a plan?

The ball currently is in Imran's court, but it appears he is stumped as to what to do with it.
Riverfront concerns
06 Dec, 2022

Riverfront concerns

THE door-to-door drive being launched by a group of landowners to mobilise affected communities against what they...
Morality police out
06 Dec, 2022

Morality police out

FOR several months, Iran has been rocked by unprecedented protests, sparked by the death on Sept 16 of Mahsa Amini, ...
Extension legacy
Updated 05 Dec, 2022

Extension legacy

The practice of having individuals carry on well beyond their time is up.
Dodging accountability
05 Dec, 2022

Dodging accountability

A WARNING carried in these pages in August appears to have gone completely unheeded. Months ago, as the government...
Double standards
05 Dec, 2022

Double standards

IN a globalised world, if states fail to protect the human rights of their citizens, or worse, participate in ...