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One woman in three a victim of domestic violence: WHO

Updated June 20, 2013
In this Thursday, July 30, 2009 file photo, shoes representing female victims of violence are displayed by protesters from the Chilean Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence in Santiago. The sign at bottom reads in Spanish “Rosa Alvarado, 31, stabbed by ex-boyfriend, 16 April 2008.” About a third of women worldwide have been physically or sexually assaulted by a former or current partner, according to the first major review of violence against women. - Photo by AP
In this Thursday, July 30, 2009 file photo, shoes representing female victims of violence are displayed by protesters from the Chilean Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence in Santiago. The sign at bottom reads in Spanish “Rosa Alvarado, 31, stabbed by ex-boyfriend, 16 April 2008.” About a third of women worldwide have been physically or sexually assaulted by a former or current partner, according to the first major review of violence against women. - Photo by AP

GENEVA: More than one woman in three around the globe is a victim of domestic violence, with those in Asia and the Middle East most-affected by the scourge, the World Health Organisation said Thursday.

In what it billed as the first-ever systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women and its health impact, the UN agency said 30 per cent worldwide faced such abuse at the hands of their partners.

“These to me are shocking statistics,” said Flavia Bustreo, head of the WHO's family, women's and children's health division.

“It's also shocking that this phenomenon cuts across the entire world,” she told reporters.

The WHO blamed taboos that prevent victims from coming forward, failings in medical and justice systems, and norms that mean men and women may see violence as acceptable.

The findings were extrapolated from figures provided by 81 countries which maintain data, and did not single out individual nations.

The scale of abuse was highest in Asia, where data from Bangladesh, East Timor, India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Thailand showed that 37.7 per cent of women were affected.

Next was the Middle East, where prevalence averaged at 37 per cent.

Sub-Saharan Africa followed, with 36.6 percent.

An average of 23.2 per cent were affected in a group of high-income countries including North America, the European Union, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

“These data really show the tremendous toll violence has on the health of women,” said Claudia Garcia-Moren, a WHO specialist on gender, reproductive rights, sexual health and adolescence.

Underlining the impact of such abuse, the WHO said that globally, 38 per cent of female murder victims were killed by their partners.

In addition, it said, violence also leaves scars long after bruises disappear and broken bones heal.

Women with a violent partner were twice as likely to suffer from depression and develop an alcohol problem, compared to women who did not experience abuse.

Victims of violence were also found to be far more likely to contract a range of sexually-transmitted diseases, from syphilis to HIV.

The study also flagged the higher likelihood of abused women having an unwanted pregnancy, an abortion, or an underweight baby -- and their children were more likely to become abusers or victims in adulthood.