Fight to preserve

All over the world groups of people are doing all they can for the betterment of humanity in the way of preserving the gifts of nature i.e. our environment and the life that keeps it running. This is a gallery showing some of the areas that need the protection of humans and some places that need to be rebuilt.—Images by Agencies.

Main herd of elephants in Zakouma National Park, 800 kms east of N'Djamena in Chad.—Photo by AFP
Main herd of elephants in Zakouma National Park, 800 kms east of N'Djamena in Chad.—Photo by AFP
A view of the 10th century monastery of St. John the Baptist "Sv. Jovan Bigorski" is seen, near Mavrovo, 130 km west of Macedonia's capital Skopje.—Photo by Reuters
A view of the 10th century monastery of St. John the Baptist "Sv. Jovan Bigorski" is seen, near Mavrovo, 130 km west of Macedonia's capital Skopje.—Photo by Reuters
Guards parade in Zakouma National Park, 800 kms east of N'Djamena in Chad. In an isolated wilderness in Chad.—Photo by AFP
Guards parade in Zakouma National Park, 800 kms east of N'Djamena in Chad. In an isolated wilderness in Chad.—Photo by AFP
Cypress trees, many of which are more than 1,000-years-old and exceed 40 feet circumference, stand in the Cache River State Natural Area near Belknap, Ill. Southern Illinoisans have hopes and fears surrounding the high-volume oil and gas drilling that may be starting in the Shawnee National Forest. Many people are beginning to brace for change as state lawmakers consider regulations that would allow energy companies to begin drilling deep in the southern Illinois bedrock for oil and natural gas, using a process kno
Cypress trees, many of which are more than 1,000-years-old and exceed 40 feet circumference, stand in the Cache River State Natural Area near Belknap, Ill. Southern Illinoisans have hopes and fears surrounding the high-volume oil and gas drilling that may be starting in the Shawnee National Forest. Many people are beginning to brace for change as state lawmakers consider regulations that would allow energy companies to begin drilling deep in the southern Illinois bedrock for oil and natural gas, using a process kno
Alarm is growing at a plan that would open up new swathes of forest on Sumatra island to mining, palm oil and paper companies, which could put orangutans and other critically endangered species at even greater risk.—Photo by AFP
Alarm is growing at a plan that would open up new swathes of forest on Sumatra island to mining, palm oil and paper companies, which could put orangutans and other critically endangered species at even greater risk.—Photo by AFP
A boy walks in floodwaters during a rainy day in Old Sanaa city.—Photo by Reuters
A boy walks in floodwaters during a rainy day in Old Sanaa city.—Photo by Reuters
Amazon Indians from different tribes perform a dance to show their unity as they continue their occupation of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam construction site for the second day, in protest against the dam's construction, in Vitoria do Xingu, near Altamira in Para State.—Photo by Reuters
Amazon Indians from different tribes perform a dance to show their unity as they continue their occupation of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam construction site for the second day, in protest against the dam's construction, in Vitoria do Xingu, near Altamira in Para State.—Photo by Reuters
Indians from the Munduruku, Juruna, Kayapo, Xipaya, Kuruaya, Asurini, Parakana and Arara tribes have paralyzed the construction of the dam, projected to become the world's third largest in energy production. They are demanding that the Brazilian government hold prior consultations with indigenous peoples before building dams that affect their lands and livelihoods, an issue that has sparked years of protests against the Belo Monte dam.—Photo by Reuters
Indians from the Munduruku, Juruna, Kayapo, Xipaya, Kuruaya, Asurini, Parakana and Arara tribes have paralyzed the construction of the dam, projected to become the world's third largest in energy production. They are demanding that the Brazilian government hold prior consultations with indigenous peoples before building dams that affect their lands and livelihoods, an issue that has sparked years of protests against the Belo Monte dam.—Photo by Reuters
The frontline is the southern Zakouma National Park: a 3,000-square-kilometre sanctuary that has lost 90 per cent of its elephants in the last 10 years.—Photo by AFP
The frontline is the southern Zakouma National Park: a 3,000-square-kilometre sanctuary that has lost 90 per cent of its elephants in the last 10 years.—Photo by AFP
In an isolated wilderness in Chad, a war is being fought to save central Africa's decimated elephant herds from gangs of ivory poachers.—Photo by AFP
In an isolated wilderness in Chad, a war is being fought to save central Africa's decimated elephant herds from gangs of ivory poachers.—Photo by AFP
An endangered Sumatran orangutan with a baby holding onto her clings on tree branches in the forest of Bukit Lawang, part of the vast Leuser National Park, its rainforests occupying areas of the two provinces of North Sumatra and Aceh located in Indonesia's Sumatra island.—Photo by AFP
An endangered Sumatran orangutan with a baby holding onto her clings on tree branches in the forest of Bukit Lawang, part of the vast Leuser National Park, its rainforests occupying areas of the two provinces of North Sumatra and Aceh located in Indonesia's Sumatra island.—Photo by AFP
A group of Magicicada septendecim cicadas are pictured in West Virginia in this handout photo taken by a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut released to Reuters on May 2, 2013. This year heralds the springtime emergence of billions of so-called 17-year periodical cicadas, with their distinctive black bodies, buggy red eyes, and orange-veined wings, along a roughly 900-mile stretch from northern Georgia to upstate New York.—Photo by Reuters
A group of Magicicada septendecim cicadas are pictured in West Virginia in this handout photo taken by a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut released to Reuters on May 2, 2013. This year heralds the springtime emergence of billions of so-called 17-year periodical cicadas, with their distinctive black bodies, buggy red eyes, and orange-veined wings, along a roughly 900-mile stretch from northern Georgia to upstate New York.—Photo by Reuters
A main fire front approaches the Blackiston Ranch as the Springs fire continues to grow near Camarillo, California. The wildfire has spread to more than 18,000 acres on day two and is 20 per cent contained.—Photo by AFP
A main fire front approaches the Blackiston Ranch as the Springs fire continues to grow near Camarillo, California. The wildfire has spread to more than 18,000 acres on day two and is 20 per cent contained.—Photo by AFP

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