Local residents grieve during a candlelight vigil in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, where victim Martin Richard lived. A Little League baseball player, Martin lived in the blue Victorian house in working-class Dorchester with his parents Bill and Denise, sister Jane, 7, and brother Henry, 10. Bill Richard told the world in an email on Tuesday that his son had been killed when bombs exploded at the marathon finish line. Martin's mother and sister were seriously injured. —Photo by Reuters
Local residents grieve during a candlelight vigil in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, where victim Martin Richard lived. A Little League baseball player, Martin lived in the blue Victorian house in working-class Dorchester with his parents Bill and Denise, sister Jane, 7, and brother Henry, 10. Bill Richard told the world in an email on Tuesday that his son had been killed. Martin's mother and sister were seriously injured. —Photo by Reuters

BOSTON: Eight-year-old Martin Richard had just gotten ice cream and was near the Boston Marathon finish line, eagerly watching for friends to run by. Krystle Campbell was enjoying the race with her best friend, hoping to get a photo of the other woman's boyfriend after he conquered the last mile.    

Then the unthinkable struck. The spirited 8-year-old, pictured on Facebook in his classroom holding a sign that read ''No more hurting people'', was dead, along with the outgoing 29-year-old woman and a graduate student from China - victims of the twin bombs that turned a scene of celebration into chaos.    More than 170 others suffered injuries that included severed limbs, shrapnel wounds and abdominal lacerations.

Jeff Bauman Jr., a man pictured in an Associated Press photo being rushed from the scene on Monday in a wheelchair, lost both legs. Rescuers took the 27-year-old to Boston Medical Center, where doctors found extensive vascular and bone damage.

''Unfortunately my son was just in the wrong place at the wrong time,'' his father, Jeff Bauman, wrote in a Facebook post.

The younger Bauman, who had been at the race to cheer on his girlfriend, had further surgery because of fluid in his abdomen.

''I just can't explain what's wrong with people today, to do this to people,'' the father wrote. ''I'm really starting to lose faith in our country.''

While mourning the dead on Tuesday, friends and neighbors tried to focus on positive memories of cherished ones whose deaths still seemed unreal to them.

''I just can't get a handle on it,'' said Jack Cunningham, a longtime friend of little Martin and his family. ''In an instant, life changes.''

This undated photo provided by Bill Richard shows his son, Martin Richard, in Boston. —AP Photo
This undated photo provided by Bill Richard shows his son, Martin Richard, in Boston. —AP Photo

Cunningham recalled how, as a pint-sized preschooler, the boy had insisted on getting out of his stroller during a 5K race in South Boston. As soon as his mom let him out to run with the rest of the family, Martin took off along the rainy race course.

''He was just having a ball, splashing in every puddle,'' Cunningham said.

The boy's father, Bill Richard, released a statement thanking friends, family and strangers for their support following his son's death.

Congressman Stephen Lynch, a family friend, said Martin and his family were trying to get over the race barriers and into the street after the first blast, when the second bomb struck.    ''They were looking in the crowd as the runners were coming to see if they could identify some of their friends when the bomb hit,'' said Lynch, who has known the Richards for 25 years.

Bill Richard, a runner and cycling enthusiast who did not run the race, had to have several ball bearings removed from his leg, Lynch said.

On Tuesday, a candle burned on the stoop of the family's single-family home in the city's Dorchester section, and the word ''Peace'' was written in chalk on the front walkway. A child's bicycle helmet lay overturned near the front lawn.

At a nearby park, ''Pray for Martin'' was written in large block letters on the pavement. Mourners later gathered for a candlelight vigil in the neighborhood. A photo of the three Richard children on Halloween in 2009 showed a smiling Martin dressed as Woody from the ''Toy Story'' films, complete with cowboy hat and sheriff's badge. Beside him stood Jane, dressed as the film character Jesse, and Henry, dressed as Harry Potter.

Kevin Andrews, headmaster at the Neighborhood House Charter School, said the school community was heartbroken by the loss of the third-grader, whom he called ''a bright, energetic young boy who had big dreams and high hopes for his future.''

Cardinal Sean O'Malley, head of the Roman Catholic Church in Boston, called a Mass on Tuesday in Israel for victims of the bombing, archdiocese officials said. He also called the pastor of St. Ann parish in Dorchester, where the Richards attend church, to say he was praying for them.

Boston University said one of the victims was a graduate student who was watching the race with friends at the finish line, which is not far from the school. The Chinese Consulate in New York said the victim was a Chinese national, though it did not identify the student. A Hong Kong broadcaster reported the student was a woman from Shenyang studying statistics. The official Chinese news agency Xinhua reported her relatives have requested she not be identified.

Krystle M. Campbell, 29, who was killed in the Boston Marathon attacks, is shown in this undated family handout photo. —Photo by Reuters
Krystle M. Campbell, 29, who was killed in the Boston Marathon attacks, is shown in this undated family handout photo. —Photo by Reuters

In nearby Medford, William Campbell described his daughter, Krystle, as the light of his life, ''a very caring, very loving person.''

''Daddy's little girl,'' the 56-year-old said.

Her mother, Patty Campbell, her voice breaking into tears, said the couple was ''heartbroken at the death of our daughter.''

''She was a wonderful person. Everybody that knew her loved her... She had a heart of gold. She was always smiling. You couldn't ask for a better daughter,'' the mother said. ''This doesn't make sense.''


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Comments (10) (Closed)


alamgir
Apr 17, 2013 07:04am
when you cry over your dead then think for a second there are people dying everywhere on the planet how many tears do you shed in their memory , none so the lesson learned is come down from your high and mighty throne and mingle amongst humanity or there will be no one to feel pity or remorse for you
Aamina
Apr 17, 2013 09:55am
I do feel bad about the people injured in the US and the ones killed but to all the Americans, don't you feel pain when little children, women and men die in Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan. Your army has ruined the lives of thousands of Muslims and other people from other races and religion, but you never feel other peoples' pain. All you see is your pain. How selfish can you be!
citizen
Apr 17, 2013 03:21pm
would appreciate if dawn also covers life stories of victims of violence here in Pakistan illustrated with pictures so they are not just nameless and faceless figures
Muhammad Ali
Apr 17, 2013 10:01am
I truly condemn the attacks be it in Pakistan or any other country. But this is something faced by us (Pakistanis) on a daily basis, imagine the pain, sorrow and mental stress these situation cause.. Even yesterday so many people died because of blasts in Peshawar... We all have the same enemy its just we need to be able to identify them from amongst ourselves.. My thoughts and prayers go with the victims..but our media should cover locals the same way they cover other countries.. So many kids like Martin have died in Pakistan in the past decade from terrorist attacks where is our media in representing them??
Arsalan
Apr 18, 2013 05:30am
Excuse me from being mean but sounds like Collateral Damage eh
Maryam
Apr 17, 2013 06:16am
Rest in Peace.
Omar
Apr 17, 2013 12:12pm
But that is no justification!
Javid Shirazi
Apr 17, 2013 08:56am
Senseless
Sheena
Apr 18, 2013 07:57am
All those who are bringing Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine and Pakistan into this - please remember that in most of the Islamic countries vilence is a way of life and muslims are killing muslims (mainly). The situation will improve drastically if you stop teaching hatred against other sects of Islam, other communities, other linguistic groups, minorities etc.
shaz
Apr 17, 2013 11:03am
No doubt such acts are always condemed whr innocent ppl die, BUT What about the feelings and struggles of ten of thousands of children whose life have been shattered horribly due to USA’s action in Afg, Pak & Irq.