01 August, 2014 / Shawwal 4, 1435

Maha Kumbh festival

Millions of Hindu pilgrims are expected to take part in the large religious congregation of a period of over a month on the banks of Sangam during the Maha Kumbh festival in January 2013, which falls every 12th year. The ceremony consists of devotees bathe for purification and is the largest religious gathering in the world, with over 40 million people in 2001.

Indian holy men sit around a bonfire amidst morning fog after arriving at Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, ahead of the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad, India.?Photo by AP
Indian holy men sit around a bonfire amidst morning fog after arriving at Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, ahead of the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad, India.?Photo by AP
A Hindu priest holds an oil lamp as he performs evening prayers near the banks of river Ganges ahead of the "Kumbh Mela" (Pitcher Festival) in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.?Photo by Reuters
A Hindu priest holds an oil lamp as he performs evening prayers near the banks of river Ganges ahead of the "Kumbh Mela" (Pitcher Festival) in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.?Photo by Reuters
Sadhus, or Hindu holy men, take part in a religious procession near the banks of the river Ganges ahead of the "Kumbh Mela" (Pitcher Festival) in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.?Photo by Reuters
Sadhus, or Hindu holy men, take part in a religious procession near the banks of the river Ganges ahead of the "Kumbh Mela" (Pitcher Festival) in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.?Photo by Reuters
A devotee prays before taking a dip in the waters of the holy Ganges river ahead of the "Kumbh Mela" (Pitcher Festival) in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.?Photo by Reuters
A devotee prays before taking a dip in the waters of the holy Ganges river ahead of the "Kumbh Mela" (Pitcher Festival) in the northern Indian city of Allahabad.?Photo by Reuters
A Hindu devotee stands in the waters of river Ganges to offer prayers to Sun god at dawn in Varanasi, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.?Photo by Reuters
A Hindu devotee stands in the waters of river Ganges to offer prayers to Sun god at dawn in Varanasi, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.?Photo by Reuters
Devotees arrive at the Sangam, the confluence of rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, as part of the Maha Kumbh festival, in Allahabad, India.?Photo by AP
Devotees arrive at the Sangam, the confluence of rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, as part of the Maha Kumbh festival, in Allahabad, India.?Photo by AP
Hindu pilgrims pray after taking a holy dip at the confluence of the river Ganges and the Bay of Bengal at Sagar Island, south of Kolkata.?Photo by Reuters
Hindu pilgrims pray after taking a holy dip at the confluence of the river Ganges and the Bay of Bengal at Sagar Island, south of Kolkata.?Photo by Reuters
Indian Sikhs perform their skills during a religious procession to start towards the Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, ahead of the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad, India. ?Photo by AP
Indian Sikhs perform their skills during a religious procession to start towards the Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, ahead of the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad, India. ?Photo by AP

Comments (8) (Closed)


Secular no more
Jan 13, 2013 10:11am
Thank you DAWN,I have often seen DAWN always publish news on INDIA.
Rocky
Jan 13, 2013 05:24pm
Millions of mela attendees who worship equally diverse array of gods and goddesses, all march together in peace to take a dip in Ganges. This is true democracy in religion.
Parikshit
Jan 14, 2013 07:29am
Awesome pics.. and good coverage of one of the world's largest congregation.
sidharth
Jan 13, 2013 04:28pm
great pics
anand
Jan 13, 2013 04:21pm
wrong statement, in 2011, 1 crore ppl gathering in allahbad ,search in google how can a newz show wrong info
Dr Shekhar
Jan 14, 2013 02:20am
I was born in Hyderabad- India and left India in 1982. Eversince, I've had friends of all faiths in the UK and thoroughly enjoyed my life so far. Pakistanis are like marmite--- either you like them/they like you or not. Dawn is the prime example of quality and impartial journalism ; which is in the same league of The Hindu, Indian Express and scores more. I strongly believe in a future where both India and Pakistan will have a symbiotic relationship to create a strong world beater. next gebnerations of both the nations are our hope. At the CWgames inNew Delhi, Pakistani contingent recieved the biggest applause. What more you need.
kishore
Jan 14, 2013 01:35am
its a once in life time experience..even if u r non hindu u shd go to the site to see the enormity..and faith
ch.Subba Rao
Jan 13, 2013 03:28pm
hat off dawn,really u cover all important event without any partiality,hence we follow dawn every day like our local newspaper