Labourers separate bottles by colour at a plastic recycling factory in Lahore Dec 7, 2012. A US town banned bottled water, aiming to "curb the worldwide problem of plastic pollution." - File Photo
Labourers separate bottles by colour at a plastic recycling factory in Lahore Dec 7, 2012. A US town banned bottled water, aiming to "curb the worldwide problem of plastic pollution." - File Photo

NEW YORK: Water, water everywhere – just not in plastic bottles, says a town in the US state of Massachusetts.

A law passed by the town of Concord went into effect with the New Year, making single-serving bottles of water illegal.

The ban is intended to encourage use of tap water and curb the worldwide problem of plastic pollution.

It only applies to “non-sparkling, unflavored drinking water.” Coke or other soft drinks are exempt.

Jean Hill, an 84-year-old activist, thought up the ban, arguing that bottles fill garbage dumps, while consumers are lured into drinking water they could obtain for a tiny fraction of the cost at their own sink.

“The bottled water companies are draining our aquifers and selling it back to us. I'm going to work until I drop on this,” Hill told The New York Times in 2010.

First time offenders get a warning. Anyone caught selling the banned bottles a second time will be fined $25, and $50 thereafter.

Updated Jan 03, 2013 11:11am

More From This Section

Comments (Closed)


Muhammad Omer Khan
Jan 03, 2013 06:37pm
Very very very well put. People are indeed being rewarded for projecting Pakistan in a negative manner
American
Jan 03, 2013 09:49pm
"I think some of us are getting rewarded for projecting Pakistan in a a manner that shows the lower end of our society". You nailed it. Bravo for your comments.
Mark Afridi
Jan 04, 2013 04:54am
Very true, Abdullah Hussain Media is the main medium
Zaheer
Jan 04, 2013 01:33am
I agree with you wholeheartedly-the irony is that not only Pakistan is depicted in a poor manner unnecessarily, the photograph has no connection whatsoever with the news about an American town trying to ban bottled Water. It simply shows lack of the thought process by the the authorities at Dawn-before publishing this story.
Faisal bin bashir
Jan 03, 2013 06:16pm
Forget something good from DAWN, ok we agree thats is founded by Quad-e-Azam, but is manage by some unprofessional (parchi staff) who got a job with a refrence, talent is out of question. Dawn even support Talibans and post each and every news of those terrorist on main page..God Bless Pakistan
Rob
Jan 04, 2013 07:11am
This is the country where government is for the people. Providing 300 million people with clean drinkable water in their homes is whats called a country. Unlike what we have here. We don't even have dirty water to bath let alone drink but we are worried why picture from Pakistan was posted here. We are a pathetic nation. Shame on us!
abbastoronto
Jan 03, 2013 04:46pm
Smart move. A few years ago it was discovered that the European bottled water contained too many harmful ingredients because it was not as thoroughly monitored as tap water is. Americans dubbed it "Acid rain from the Alps" and rightly so.
Skaukat Farooq
Jan 04, 2013 07:32am
I fully support this move but multinationals are too strong for governaments at all levels.I however salute the compaigner Jean Hill for standing up at this stage of life when most people loose interest in life itself.
Khan
Jan 03, 2013 01:24pm
Finally a good news. It is never too late...I guess.
Abdullah Hussain
Jan 03, 2013 02:51pm
I fail to understand why this photograph from a factory in Lahore was posted with an American news. I think our media is not projecting Pakistan in a correct manner. It would have been appropriate if a photo of a re-cycling plant of America was shown. I think some of us are getting rewarded for projecting Pakistan in a a manner that shows the lower end of our society. We are not doing any good by intentionally or un-intentionally defaming our own motherland.