The last day at FPW (which couldn’t be included in the main story last week due to time restrictions) revealed some pleasant surprises, rounding off the three-day ‘week’ with an aesthetic balance that was severely lacking when it started.

Making the connection between showings and sales, the exclusive brand of handcrafted crocheted garments — Delphi (by Nida Tapal and Nargis Kiani) — was to make a runway debut on the last day. While crocheted garments may have a very niche market, the finesse with which the collection was designed showcased its strength and was quite impressive.

High street brand FnkAsia by Huma Adnan took an innovative trip to Africa by including customised weaves and fringes into the Autumn/Winter forecast. This was the brand’s most innovative collection to date and introduced streamlined silhouettes as opposed to flare and drape that it is usually associated with.

Maheen Karim, however, opened the day with one of its strongest shows. Her take on winter luxury prêt was centralised in fluid gowns, blazers and silhouettes perfect for the party season. Hints of power dressing were introduced through military inspirations and they added a novelty value to the glamorous collection.

Misha Lakhani — also making a debut at FPW — failed to make an impact for her brand. This collection lacked cohesion and came across as a selection from her store rather than a conceptualised effort.

Fashion Week ended with the Karachi 6 show, which basically featured six of the city’s established designers: Shamaeel, Sadaf Malaterre, Deepak Perwani, Shehla Chatoor, Amir Adnan and Maheen Khan. This show could have been called déjà vu because it displayed flashbacks of old collections and except for the capsule put out by Shehla Chatoor, nothing appeared fresh or new.

Shehla Chatoor, who should have extended her capsule into a full collection and done the grand finale, showcased eight perfectly designed pieces done on silk screen prints and accessorised with her signature gold mesh.

Updated Nov 04, 2012 12:03am

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