Trees of Pakistan

There is a great variety of native trees in Pakistan, which many of us cannot identify. The following is a photographic index of some of the trees you can see across the country. – Text and photos by Sayed Qamar Mehdi

The Arabic Gum tree (Acacia nilotica), locally known as "Kiker", is common in Punjab. It is known as "dukh such ka saathi": a friend through joy and sorrow.
The Arabic Gum tree (Acacia nilotica), locally known as "Kiker", is common in Punjab. It is known as "dukh such ka saathi": a friend through joy and sorrow.
The Golden Shower tree (Casia Fistula), locally known as "Amaltas", bears a fruit which is used in local herbal medicine. It is also called "umeed ka phool": flower of hope.
The Golden Shower tree (Casia Fistula), locally known as "Amaltas", bears a fruit which is used in local herbal medicine. It is also called "umeed ka phool": flower of hope.
The White Marudha (Terminalia Arjuna), locally known as "Arjun", is a beautiful tree. In local languages it is called "baaghon ka muhafiz": protector of gardens.
The White Marudha (Terminalia Arjuna), locally known as "Arjun", is a beautiful tree. In local languages it is called "baaghon ka muhafiz": protector of gardens.
The Silk Cotton tree (Bombax Ceiba), locally known as "Sumbal". A tree that matches its name in beauty, and it is often covered with flowers and strands of silk.
The Silk Cotton tree (Bombax Ceiba), locally known as "Sumbal". A tree that matches its name in beauty, and it is often covered with flowers and strands of silk.
Salt Cedar (Tamarix Aphylla), locally known as "Okan". Some call it "meherban dost": the considerate friend.
Salt Cedar (Tamarix Aphylla), locally known as "Okan". Some call it "meherban dost": the considerate friend.
Indian Coral tree/Flame tree (Erythrina Stricta Subirosa), this tree bears different coloured flowers and is often called "Rangeela": or colourful.
Indian Coral tree/Flame tree (Erythrina Stricta Subirosa), this tree bears different coloured flowers and is often called "Rangeela": or colourful.
Indian Beech tree (Pongamia Pinata), locally known as "Sukh Chain" or the tree of tranquility and happiness.
Indian Beech tree (Pongamia Pinata), locally known as "Sukh Chain" or the tree of tranquility and happiness.
Camel's Foot tree (Bahunia Alba), locally known as "Kachnar". It bears a pod which is also cooked and eaten.
Camel's Foot tree (Bahunia Alba), locally known as "Kachnar". It bears a pod which is also cooked and eaten.
Mexican Oleander (Nerium Oleander) locally known as "Kanair", is common in the villages and gardens of Punjab.
Mexican Oleander (Nerium Oleander) locally known as "Kanair", is common in the villages and gardens of Punjab.
Indian Temple tree (Plumieria) locally known as "Champa". This is a tree that needs no introduction, and bears a scent that has inspired many a poet.
Indian Temple tree (Plumieria) locally known as "Champa". This is a tree that needs no introduction, and bears a scent that has inspired many a poet.
Chinese Rose (Hibiscus Sinensis), locally known as "Gularh". And is often called "Sada Suhangan": the evergreen.
Chinese Rose (Hibiscus Sinensis), locally known as "Gularh". And is often called "Sada Suhangan": the evergreen.
Indian Jojoba (Ziziphus Mouritiana), locally known as "Bair", and bears the famous fruit of the same name.
Indian Jojoba (Ziziphus Mouritiana), locally known as "Bair", and bears the famous fruit of the same name.
White Mulberry (Morus Alba), locally known as "Toote". This tree is famed for its shade and its fruit. A Punjabi saying "thandia chaun toot dian" celebrates the cool shade of this tree.
White Mulberry (Morus Alba), locally known as "Toote". This tree is famed for its shade and its fruit. A Punjabi saying "thandia chaun toot dian" celebrates the cool shade of this tree.
Prosopis Cineraria (Prosopis Cineraria), locally known as "Jand".
Prosopis Cineraria (Prosopis Cineraria), locally known as "Jand".

Comments (5) (Closed)


Kamyla
Aug 03, 2012 10:17am
So lovely to see these trees getting some space in the Dawn page. But where are some of our greats? Neem, Golmohar, Savanjna and the Rain Tree?
Umar Farooq
Aug 13, 2012 12:16pm
Dear Syed Qamar Mehdi, sir, a great job. Simply marvellous. I have been looking for something like this for years. Please keep up the good work and I am looking forward to a second part of this article with those trees included which were left out in part 1. Any additional info on each tree is also welcome. Thanks. Umar Farooq, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Raheel
Aug 03, 2012 09:05am
Informative stuff!
Qamar Mehdi
Aug 07, 2012 08:39am
Thanks for your interest and appreciation. This is a preamble and the real introduction our own indigenous trees, their joy and sorrow will come to these pages. We try to cover what happened to them in their own beloved motherland by their own fellow countrymen!!!!!
Rahat
Aug 10, 2012 04:13pm
Excellent article. Awareness is the first and most important step in resolving any problem. I want to congratulate Qamar Mehdi and Dawn in taking this big step. Keep up the good work and hopefully soon, we can start reversing the harmful effects of our actions to our environment. Global warming already at our door (or already inside) all of us should promote these efforts. With our actions now, our children might be able to enjoy the shades, the smells, the flowers and off course the fruits of our local long lasting trees and clean air as a bonus, inshaAllah.