Snippets from Sudan

For decades, Sudan's southerners fought the country's predominately Arab rulers in the north. More than two million people died before the fighting ended in a peace deal in 2005. In a referendum promised by the pact, 99 percent of the southerners chose to secede, and on July 9, 2011, the flag of South Sudan was raised over Juba, the rickety new capital. The world's youngest nation South Sudan has had a rough first year: border wars with the North, internal violence and shutdown of the oil production its economy depends on. With the first anniversary of independence from former civil war foes Sudan on July 9, 2012 euphoria has given way to a harsh reality. While massive steps forward have been made, South Sudan remains one of the poorest countries on earth, where even the most basic infrastructure such as roads, electricity and water distribution networks still has to be built.

South Sudanese boys holding candles as the clock ticks over to midnight on July 9, 2011 to mark the day that South Sudan will officially declare independence from the north in Juba, the capital of the soon-to-be Republic of South Sudan. – Photo by AFP
South Sudanese boys holding candles as the clock ticks over to midnight on July 9, 2011 to mark the day that South Sudan will officially declare independence from the north in Juba, the capital of the soon-to-be Republic of South Sudan. – Photo by AFP
Children's hands are seen as they cut meat at their home in Pibor, South Sudan. – Photo by Reuters
Children's hands are seen as they cut meat at their home in Pibor, South Sudan. – Photo by Reuters
A boy tightens the hide on his drum before church services at the Presbyterian Church in Pibor. – Photo by Reuters
A boy tightens the hide on his drum before church services at the Presbyterian Church in Pibor. – Photo by Reuters
A woman prays during a Sunday service at the Presbyterian Church in Pibor, South Sudan. – Photo by Reuters
A woman prays during a Sunday service at the Presbyterian Church in Pibor, South Sudan. – Photo by Reuters
A family from the Murle tribe stands near a burned out shelter in Pibor, after ethnic clashes. In a referendum promised by the pact, 99 percent of the southerners chose to secede, and on July 9, 2011, the flag of South Sudan was raised over Juba, the rickety new capital. – Photo by Reuters
A family from the Murle tribe stands near a burned out shelter in Pibor, after ethnic clashes. In a referendum promised by the pact, 99 percent of the southerners chose to secede, and on July 9, 2011, the flag of South Sudan was raised over Juba, the rickety new capital. – Photo by Reuters
Thousands of refugees are streaming into the country every week to avoid violence on Sudan's side of the border. – Photo by AP
Thousands of refugees are streaming into the country every week to avoid violence on Sudan's side of the border. – Photo by AP
A young girl with malaria rests in the inpatient ward of the Malualkon Primary Health Care Center in Malualkon. Development experts have grown more sophisticated in recent decades about how they deliver aid. – Photo by Reuters
A young girl with malaria rests in the inpatient ward of the Malualkon Primary Health Care Center in Malualkon. Development experts have grown more sophisticated in recent decades about how they deliver aid. – Photo by Reuters
A detail of one of a few broken ambulances at the Aweil State Hospital, the only hospital in the South Sudanese state of Northern Bahr el Ghazal June. As in many developing nations, international aid is both an invaluable help to South Sudan and a crutch that sometimes enables it to avoid reality. – Photo by Reuters
A detail of one of a few broken ambulances at the Aweil State Hospital, the only hospital in the South Sudanese state of Northern Bahr el Ghazal June. As in many developing nations, international aid is both an invaluable help to South Sudan and a crutch that sometimes enables it to avoid reality. – Photo by Reuters
A woman carrying her sick child climbs into an International Rescue Committee (IRC) vehicle to travel to the Aweil State Hospital in Aweil from the Malualkon Primary Health Care Center in Malualkon, in the South Sudanese state of Northern Bahr el Ghazal. – Photo by Reuters
A woman carrying her sick child climbs into an International Rescue Committee (IRC) vehicle to travel to the Aweil State Hospital in Aweil from the Malualkon Primary Health Care Center in Malualkon, in the South Sudanese state of Northern Bahr el Ghazal. – Photo by Reuters
Female child refugees who escaped violence on Sudan's side of the disputed border, queue up inside Yida refugee camp, South Sudan. The world's newest nation, South Sudan, is celebrating its first birthday and while the largest achievement over the last year was avoiding a return to all-out war with Sudan. – Photo by AP
Female child refugees who escaped violence on Sudan's side of the disputed border, queue up inside Yida refugee camp, South Sudan. The world's newest nation, South Sudan, is celebrating its first birthday and while the largest achievement over the last year was avoiding a return to all-out war with Sudan. – Photo by AP

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