Highlights from Teej Festival

‘Teej’ means ‘third’, and it falls on the third day after the moonless night and the third day after the full moon night of every month. Traditionally Teej is celebrated mainly in Bihar, Chattisgarh, Haryana, Punjab, Rajasthan & Uttar Pradesh in different forms. However, now it is also observed in Delhi, NCR and Madhya Pradesh.

Teej is observed by women for wellness of their husband. – Photo by AFP
Teej is observed by women for wellness of their husband. – Photo by AFP
The three-day long Teej festival, is celebrated by Hindu women in Nepal and some parts of India. Unmarried women wish for handsome husbands and happy conjugal lives. – Photo by AFP
The three-day long Teej festival, is celebrated by Hindu women in Nepal and some parts of India. Unmarried women wish for handsome husbands and happy conjugal lives. – Photo by AFP
Indian Hindu Nepali devotees offer prayers to the Hindu god of destruction Lord Shiva as they celebrate the Teej festival in Siliguri on September 8, 2013. – Photo by AFP
Indian Hindu Nepali devotees offer prayers to the Hindu god of destruction Lord Shiva as they celebrate the Teej festival in Siliguri on September 8, 2013. – Photo by AFP
A Nepalese woman washes her hands before offering prayers at the Pashupatinath Hindu temple. – Photo by AP
A Nepalese woman washes her hands before offering prayers at the Pashupatinath Hindu temple. – Photo by AP
Indian Hindu Nepali devotees offer prayers to the Hindu god of destruction Lord Shiva. – Photo by AFP
Indian Hindu Nepali devotees offer prayers to the Hindu god of destruction Lord Shiva. – Photo by AFP
Teej is a festival celebrated in many states of India and by Khas women of Nepal. – Photo by AFP
Teej is a festival celebrated in many states of India and by Khas women of Nepal. – Photo by AFP
‘Teej’ means ‘third’, and therefore, it falls on the third day after the moonless night and the third day after the full moon night of every month. – Photo by AP
‘Teej’ means ‘third’, and therefore, it falls on the third day after the moonless night and the third day after the full moon night of every month. – Photo by AP
As Shraavana month falls during monsoon or rainy season when the surroundings become green, the Shraavana Teej is also called Hariyali Teej. – Photo by Reuters
As Shraavana month falls during monsoon or rainy season when the surroundings become green, the Shraavana Teej is also called Hariyali Teej. – Photo by Reuters
Dedicated to the Goddess Parvati, commemorating her union with Lord Shiva, the festival is celebrated for sexual bliss, well-being of spouse and children and purification of own body and soul. – Photo by AP
Dedicated to the Goddess Parvati, commemorating her union with Lord Shiva, the festival is celebrated for sexual bliss, well-being of spouse and children and purification of own body and soul. – Photo by AP
The third day after the new moon or Amavasya of Shraavana month is the most important Teej. – Photo by AP
The third day after the new moon or Amavasya of Shraavana month is the most important Teej. – Photo by AP
Teej is celebrated in Bihar, Chattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab, and Uttar Pradesh in India. – Photo by Reuters
Teej is celebrated in Bihar, Chattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab, and Uttar Pradesh in India. – Photo by Reuters
It falls on the third day after the new moon of the Shraavana or Saawan month of Hindu calendar in late July to early August. – Photo by Reuters
It falls on the third day after the new moon of the Shraavana or Saawan month of Hindu calendar in late July to early August. – Photo by Reuters
The festival is a three-day-long celebration that combines sumptuous feasts as well as rigid fasting. – Photo by Reuters
The festival is a three-day-long celebration that combines sumptuous feasts as well as rigid fasting. – Photo by Reuters

Comments (5) (Closed)


Nav
Sep 10, 2013 08:26pm

I really appreciate efforts made by Dawn in spreading cultural values of different sects/faiths and in doing so it enhances harmony and tolerance among people. I got to know so many things about Islam here only and shared with my Muslim friends, which they did not aware. Thank you Dawn

nafees
Sep 11, 2013 05:24am

oh...i can see the great difference between the expression of photo snaps of "World Hijab Day" and "Highlights from Teej Festival" ... our women looks more tensed ..... if you are not happy here, what is the guarantee that you will be happy hereafter ??

aks
Sep 11, 2013 09:13pm

Good photos, highlight uniqueness of this land.

aks
Sep 11, 2013 09:17pm

Good photos; highlight the uniqueness of this land

Dahir
Sep 12, 2013 01:23am

Appreciation by Pakistanis of a festival celebrated by their ancestors too is commendable