SAD as it is, bombings in Pakistan have increasingly over the years had precise targets and identifiable motives: to kill and maim in as large numbers as possible. When citizens hear an explosion, it is for good reason that they fear the worst. That is what happened on Tuesday evening as four locations in Karachi — three in Defence Housing Authority and one in Gulshan-i-Iqbal — were jolted by loud explosions. The reality, thankfully, turned out to be less grim than expected. The explosions were caused by firecrackers rather than bombs and the damage wasn’t great, particularly since the wine shops near which they occurred were closed.

As to why, the police’s best guess is that they were perpetrated by militants as part of a plan to spread “organised panic” in the country. That may well be true, even though it is hard to understand why militants would resort to less damaging means of spreading fear when they are patently not shy of using the most lethal tactics. Another explanation can be found in the fact that the incidents occurred just a few days before Eid, a time when criminal gangs redouble their efforts to milk the city’s businesses of as much ‘protection’ money as possible. The extortion racket in Karachi is well-established and holds hostage much of the commercial and business activity. The days in the run-up to Eid see a surge in spending and cash withdrawals. What better time to remind ‘clients’ of the consequences of failing to offer ‘Eidi’ to the extortionists? Whatever the broader debate about the place, if any, of alcohol in society the security of such premises in commercial hubs is a serious issue. More can be done to keep the peace in these areas.


Do you have information you wish to share with Dawn.com? You can email our News Desk to share news tips, reports and general feedback. You can also email the Blog Desk if you have an opinion or narrative to share, or reach out to the Special Projects Desk to send us your Photos, or Videos.

More From This Section

Tensions on Pak-Iran border

WHILE certain sections of the geostrategic community in Pakistan have always touted the geographic importance of the...

Licence suspension

A MERE four months after Geo News was fined and its broadcast licence temporarily suspended by Pemra, on Monday it...

Talk of nukes

THE nuclear boast by a federal minister in the National Assembly on Monday was not required. The minister, retired...

Comments (2) (Closed)


Khalid
Aug 08, 2013 03:29pm

All these terrorists are known to public and also known to police. One of the biggest problems in Karachi is the illegal colonies spread around the city. No one has paid for the land, no one pays for the electricity and no one in the government cares as to who these people are. The sooner we get rid of these, the better. Can anyone send a letter to a "kati-pahari" address?

Agha Ata
Aug 08, 2013 07:42pm

Explosions at wine shops is a sin.