22 August, 2014 / Shawwal 25, 1435
Members of the Red Cross look at an explosion of a Pemex oil pipeline in Tonanitla, near Mexico City. At least seven people were injured by an explosion after an attempt to illegally tap a pipeline belonging to the Mexican state oil monopoly Pemex near Mexico City, officials said on Sunday. The early morning blast at the crude oil pipeline occurred in Tonanitla about 40 km (25 miles) north of the capital, and was now under control, Pemex said on its Twitter account.—Photo by Reuters
Members of the Red Cross look at an explosion of a Pemex oil pipeline in Tonanitla, near Mexico City. At least seven people were injured by an explosion after an attempt to illegally tap a pipeline belonging to the Mexican state oil monopoly Pemex near Mexico City, officials said on Sunday. The early morning blast at the crude oil pipeline occurred in Tonanitla about 40 km (25 miles) north of the capital, and was now under control, Pemex said on its Twitter account.—Photo by Reuters
Ethnic Uighur customers select goats at a fair on a street in Aksu, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region July 21, 2013.—Photo by Reuters
Ethnic Uighur customers select goats at a fair on a street in Aksu, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region July 21, 2013.—Photo by Reuters
The mother of rape victim Irina Krashkova, 69-year-old Maria cries during an interview with the Associated Press, in the town of Vradiyevka, southern Ukraine. Corruption, lawlessness and the impunity of government officials and their wealthy friends, be it a national lawmaker, a businessman in an expensive car or a small town cop, have increased significantly since the 2010 election of President Viktor Yanukovych, watchdogs say.—Photo by AP
The mother of rape victim Irina Krashkova, 69-year-old Maria cries during an interview with the Associated Press, in the town of Vradiyevka, southern Ukraine. Corruption, lawlessness and the impunity of government officials and their wealthy friends, be it a national lawmaker, a businessman in an expensive car or a small town cop, have increased significantly since the 2010 election of President Viktor Yanukovych, watchdogs say.—Photo by AP
Workers count kyat banknotes at the office of a local bank in Yangon. Myanmar's government has signalled it could let foreign banks buy stakes in local lenders as it worries that resistance by domestic banks to joint ventures could hamper plans to attract investment and rebuild the financial system.—Photo by Reuters
Workers count kyat banknotes at the office of a local bank in Yangon. Myanmar's government has signalled it could let foreign banks buy stakes in local lenders as it worries that resistance by domestic banks to joint ventures could hamper plans to attract investment and rebuild the financial system.—Photo by Reuters
Duvvuri Subbarao, governor of the Reserve Bank of India, speaks during "The Citi Series on Asian Business Leaders" at the Asia Society in New York in this August 29, 2012 file photo. The identity of India's next central bank chief remains a matter of speculation even as Reserve Bank of India Governor Subbarao scrambles to support an embattled rupee with less than seven weeks to go before he is due to leave office. An extension of Subbarao's tenure, once unlikely, has become a possibility as the rupee reels from a s
Duvvuri Subbarao, governor of the Reserve Bank of India, speaks during "The Citi Series on Asian Business Leaders" at the Asia Society in New York in this August 29, 2012 file photo. The identity of India's next central bank chief remains a matter of speculation even as Reserve Bank of India Governor Subbarao scrambles to support an embattled rupee with less than seven weeks to go before he is due to leave office. An extension of Subbarao's tenure, once unlikely, has become a possibility as the rupee reels from a s
Labourers work on ongoing road repairs along a main street at Mandaluyong city, metro Manila. The Philippines, the former "sick man" of Asia, has fortified its economy, positioning it to weather storms engulfing the region's vulnerable emerging markets and to snap back faster when global growth recovers.—Photo by Reuters
Labourers work on ongoing road repairs along a main street at Mandaluyong city, metro Manila. The Philippines, the former "sick man" of Asia, has fortified its economy, positioning it to weather storms engulfing the region's vulnerable emerging markets and to snap back faster when global growth recovers.—Photo by Reuters
A worker disembarks a Swiber support vessel at one of their shipyards in Singapore. Singapore's Swiber Holdings, which owns the world's largest fleet of offshore construction vessels for shallow water and wants to venture into deepwater, is looking at Islamic bonds, or sukuk, after raising $754 million from corporate bond markets.—Photo by Reuters
A worker disembarks a Swiber support vessel at one of their shipyards in Singapore. Singapore's Swiber Holdings, which owns the world's largest fleet of offshore construction vessels for shallow water and wants to venture into deepwater, is looking at Islamic bonds, or sukuk, after raising $754 million from corporate bond markets.—Photo by Reuters
People wave Japanese national flags as Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (not pictured) and leader of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) speaks to voters while campaigning for the July 21 Upper house election in Tokyo. The dollar slipped against the yen in late trade on Friday ahead of elections for Japan's upper house Sunday which could add momentum to Abe's aggressive push for monetary easing to lift growth and fight deflation.—Photo by Reuters
People wave Japanese national flags as Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (not pictured) and leader of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) speaks to voters while campaigning for the July 21 Upper house election in Tokyo. The dollar slipped against the yen in late trade on Friday ahead of elections for Japan's upper house Sunday which could add momentum to Abe's aggressive push for monetary easing to lift growth and fight deflation.—Photo by Reuters
Local residents of San Juan Sacatepequez hold black flags as a symbolic act of mourning, during a protest against the inauguration of the construction of Cementos Progreso Company, a cement factory in San Juan Sacatepequez, 30 km (18 miles), from Guatemala City. Thousands of local residents protested against the construction of the factory on Friday, saying the factory will cause economic and ecological damage to the community, according to local media.—Photo by Reuters
Local residents of San Juan Sacatepequez hold black flags as a symbolic act of mourning, during a protest against the inauguration of the construction of Cementos Progreso Company, a cement factory in San Juan Sacatepequez, 30 km (18 miles), from Guatemala City. Thousands of local residents protested against the construction of the factory on Friday, saying the factory will cause economic and ecological damage to the community, according to local media.—Photo by Reuters
A woman holds a photograph of her relative, a garment worker who is still missing after the collapse of the Rana Plaza building, as she and others take part in a protest in front of the head office of Bangladesh Garment Manufactures & Exporters Association (BGMEA) in Dhaka July 21, 2013. Activists of Garments Sramik Sangram Parisad, a workers' rights movement, staged a protest demanding the fast payment of compensation for the Rana Plaza victims and to increase the minimum wage of all garments workers, local media
A woman holds a photograph of her relative, a garment worker who is still missing after the collapse of the Rana Plaza building, as she and others take part in a protest in front of the head office of Bangladesh Garment Manufactures & Exporters Association (BGMEA) in Dhaka July 21, 2013. Activists of Garments Sramik Sangram Parisad, a workers' rights movement, staged a protest demanding the fast payment of compensation for the Rana Plaza victims and to increase the minimum wage of all garments workers, local media
Indian teacher Kamalbhai Parmar,66, watches students eat a meal at the Footpath School in Ahmedabad. The Footpath School was started by Parmar, who runs a metal fabrication business and has been teaching his students on a footpath for the past twelve years. Parmar and his sons started the school for children of labourers, ragpickers and domestic servants so the children could receive extra education and a meal free of cost.—Photo by AFP
Indian teacher Kamalbhai Parmar,66, watches students eat a meal at the Footpath School in Ahmedabad. The Footpath School was started by Parmar, who runs a metal fabrication business and has been teaching his students on a footpath for the past twelve years. Parmar and his sons started the school for children of labourers, ragpickers and domestic servants so the children could receive extra education and a meal free of cost.—Photo by AFP

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