At least eight separate blasts rocked three different provinces of Pakistan in the last 24 hours, raising fears for deteriorating law and order as the historic May 11 polls draw nearer.

The attacks since Tuesday evening in Quetta, Karachi, Peshawar and Dera Ismail Khan have now claimed 11 lives and have left up to 75 wounded.

Pakistani security officials search a vehicle, found packed with explosives, after its seizure by police in the outskirts of Islamabad on April 23, 2013. The explosives-laden car was found parked on a roadside leading to the villa of former Pakistani military ruler Pervez Musharraf, where he is under house arrest. The Pakistani Taliban have threatened to assassinate the former military ruler who escaped three assassination attempts during his 1999-2008 rule who lost public support during his self exile. — AFP Photo
Pakistani security officials search a vehicle, found packed with explosives, after its seizure by police in the outskirts of Islamabad on April 23, 2013. The explosives-laden car was found parked on a roadside leading to the villa of former Pakistani military ruler Pervez Musharraf, where he is under house arrest. The Pakistani Taliban have threatened to assassinate the former military ruler who escaped three assassination attempts during his 1999-2008 rule who lost public support during his self exile. — AFP Photo
Pakistani security officials examine the site of a suicide bomb attack in Quetta on April 23, 2013. A suicide bomber blew up his car at a check point near a Shiite dominated area in southwest Pakistan late on April 23, killing a soldier and wounding more than 30, officials said. — AFP Photo
Pakistani security officials examine the site of a suicide bomb attack in Quetta on April 23, 2013. A suicide bomber blew up his car at a check point near a Shiite dominated area in southwest Pakistan late on April 23, killing a soldier and wounding more than 30, officials said. — AFP Photo
Pakistani paramilitary soldiers examine the site of a suicide bomb attack in Quetta on April 23, 2013. A suicide bomber blew up his car at a check point near a Shiite dominated area in southwest Pakistan late on April 23, killing a soldier and wounding more than 30, officials said. — AFP Photo
Pakistani paramilitary soldiers examine the site of a suicide bomb attack in Quetta on April 23, 2013. A suicide bomber blew up his car at a check point near a Shiite dominated area in southwest Pakistan late on April 23, killing a soldier and wounding more than 30, officials said. — AFP Photo
A security official shows a detonated grenade found at the site of a bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. The bomb blast, which happened near a private hospital, injured at least 13 people, including two children in the city's Satellite Town area on Wednesday, according to local media. The explosive device, detonated with a remote control, was planted on a bicycle, the news report said.  — Reuters Photo
A security official shows a detonated grenade found at the site of a bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. The bomb blast, which happened near a private hospital, injured at least 13 people, including two children in the city's Satellite Town area on Wednesday, according to local media. The explosive device, detonated with a remote control, was planted on a bicycle, the news report said. — Reuters Photo
Residents talk outside a shop that was hit by Tuesday's bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing global attention to a growing cam
Residents talk outside a shop that was hit by Tuesday's bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing global attention to a growing cam
Debris is pictured in a damaged office of Pakistan Muslim League (N) after Tuesday's bomb blast in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing globa
Debris is pictured in a damaged office of Pakistan Muslim League (N) after Tuesday's bomb blast in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing globa
A man reacts at the site of a bomb blast where his children were injured in Quetta April 23, 2013. Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority suffered a fresh blow on Tuesday when a suicide car bomber killed at least five people and wounded dozens in the attack in Quetta that came close to killing one of the community's top politicians, police said. — Reuters Photo
A man reacts at the site of a bomb blast where his children were injured in Quetta April 23, 2013. Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority suffered a fresh blow on Tuesday when a suicide car bomber killed at least five people and wounded dozens in the attack in Quetta that came close to killing one of the community's top politicians, police said. — Reuters Photo
Residents stand among rubble and debris at the site of Tuesday's bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing global attention to a gr
Residents stand among rubble and debris at the site of Tuesday's bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing global attention to a gr
Security officials are seen at the site of a bomb blast in Quetta April 23, 2013. Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority suffered a fresh blow on Tuesday when a suicide car bomber killed at least five people and wounded dozens in the attack in Quetta that came close to killing one of the community's top politicians, police said. — Reuters Photo
Security officials are seen at the site of a bomb blast in Quetta April 23, 2013. Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority suffered a fresh blow on Tuesday when a suicide car bomber killed at least five people and wounded dozens in the attack in Quetta that came close to killing one of the community's top politicians, police said. — Reuters Photo
Children walk at the site of Tuesday's bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing global attention to a growing campaign of persecut
Children walk at the site of Tuesday's bomb attack in Quetta April 24, 2013. A prominent leader of Pakistan's ethnic Hazara minority narrowly escaped the suicide attack that killed six people on Tuesday, underscoring the growing threat militants pose to secular politicians in the run-up to next month's general elections. The blast in Quetta was the worst attack since a series of bombings in the city at the start of the year killed almost 200 people, briefly drawing global attention to a growing campaign of persecut

Comments (3) Closed




diyaa110
Apr 24, 2013 12:16pm
Stop calling them Hazaras, they are not being killed because they are Hazaras - they are being killed because they are Shias.
JairAM
Apr 26, 2013 04:42am
...and your point is.....
Iqbal
Apr 25, 2013 05:41am
no coverage for Karachi blast?