Afghanistan seeks explanation for Taliban office

Updated Jun 23, 2013 07:06pm
This photo was taken on Thursday, June 20, 2013 shows the new office of the Afghan Taliban in Doha, Qatar after the opening of the office several days ago. The United States on Thursday welcomed Qatar's decision to take down a sign that cast the Taliban's new office in Doha as a rival Afghan embassy saying the militant group can't represent itself "as an emirate, government or sovereign." (AP Photo/Osama Faisal)
This photo was taken on Thursday, June 20, 2013 shows the new office of the Afghan Taliban in Doha, Qatar after the opening of the office several days ago. The United States on Thursday welcomed Qatar's decision to take down a sign that cast the Taliban's new office in Doha as a rival Afghan embassy saying the militant group can't represent itself "as an emirate, government or sovereign." (AP Photo/Osama Faisal)

KABUL: Afghanistan's government said Sunday it is still waiting for a full explanation of how the Taliban were allowed to open an office in Qatar that was akin to an embassy, flying the militant group's flag and using its formal name from the years it ruled the country.

But Foreign Ministry spokesman Janan Mosazai said the Afghan government remains willing to send a peace delegation to Doha to negotiate with the Taliban once it has its explanation, as well as assurances that the office will be nothing more than a place for talks.

''The Afghan government remains fully committed to pursue a process of peace negotiations with the armed opposition, including the Taliban, but within the confines of the conditions and the principles and the assurances that we have established,'' Mosazai told reporters in Kabul.

The diplomatic incident served as a reminder of just how difficult a task lies ahead in getting all sides to the negotiating table after nearly 12 years of war.

The Taliban's office opened Tuesday in a ceremony broadcast on live television, accompanied by a simultaneous announcement that US officials would begin formal talks with Taliban representatives, which eventually would be joined by the Afghan government.

That raised hopes that the long-stalled peace process could finally begin.

But the Taliban's use of its old flag and a sign bearing the name of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, which the movement used during its five-year rule that ended in 2001 with the US-led invasion, provoked outrage across party lines in Afghanistan.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai reacted sharply, suspending negotiations with the US over what presence international forces may keep in Afghanistan after 2014 and demanded the offending sign and flag be removed.

The Taliban has since complied after the Qatar government intervened.

Both the US and the Qataris said the Taliban had agreed on the pre-approved name but violated the pact at the ribbon cutting ceremony.

In an e-mailed statement Sunday, however, Taliban spokesman Muhammad Naeem said the use of the flag and name was ''done with the agreement of the Qatari government.''

''The statement which states that by using the name and raising the flag, the Islamic Emirate somehow violated an agreement... is completely false,'' Naeem said in an English-language statement.

The Qatari government had no immediate response.

On Saturday, Taliban spokesman Shaheen Suhail suggested the Taliban was willing to move ahead with peace talks, despite ''much anger'' among some members over the removal of the name and the lowering of the Taliban's white flag emblazoned with a Quranic verse in black.

Mosazai said, however, that Afghanistan is still waiting for a full explanation from Washington and guarantees the Taliban will not attempt to revert to its formal name again.

''We need an explanation about how this happened, why this happened, who made this happen, and then for the office and its terms of reference to be brought back into full compliance with the written assurances given to the Afghan government prior to the establishment of the office,'' he said.

He also suggested that after ''initial contacts'' between the Taliban and the United States, the Afghan government expects to lead official peace talks and would push to move them to Afghanistan.

''Official negotiations in the context of the peace process will have to be, and can only take place, between the (Afghan) High Peace Council on the one hand and the authorized representatives of the Taliban on the other,'' he said. ''Our preference would be for those negotiations to take place inside Afghanistan after the initial stage.''


Do you have information you wish to share with Dawn.com? You can email our News Desk to share news tips, reports and general feedback. You can also email the Blog Desk if you have an opinion or narrative to share, or reach out to the Special Projects Desk to send us your Photos, or Videos.

More From This Section

Comments (4) Closed


Agha Ata
Jun 23, 2013 06:33pm

It doesn

Imtiaz
Jun 23, 2013 09:45pm

So Taliban is a force to reckoned with, which means harsh Shariah punishments and depriving women of their due rights.

Aristotle
Jun 24, 2013 02:47am

Any country can not have two names & parallel Governments, these bandits are outlaws in their own Country, can Qatar explain that despite very tough laws that they have on which Passports these criminals were allowed to enter Doha, which Airport they boarded from to reach Qatar (I am sure they did not walk to Bandar Abbas by foot from Afghanistan and then crossed the Gulf on a Dhow) and above all what credentials they had with them when they signed the so-called "Agreement" with Qatari Government to establish Office in Doha.The whole drama seems to have been staged by the US in collaboration with Qatar which always act as de-facto State of the US.

ezanius
Jun 24, 2013 11:37am

Afghanistan seeks explanation for Taliban office: hahahahahaha