THIS is apropos of the article by Zubeida Mustafa, ‘Invisible little workers’ (June 19). What an irony to know about the deplorable plight of the poor souls and yet not being able to do something for them.

No one can hope a child with such a pitiful background to live up to the expectations of a society and neither can we blame them for their criminal acts. Such people are exploited by anti-government organisations as they can easily be brainwashed as they are emotionally vulnerable.

I once happened to interview a little Pathan working at his elder brother’s ‘Paratha Café’.

When I asked him why he did not go to school, he said: “Why should I study if I have to return here and start earning money?” I tried to convince him but his brother intervened and said he earned a lot here and someday he would marry and start his own business with the money he would earn here.

I kept wondering how these poor little workers are being exploited without complaints and smiles on their faces.

The government should understand the plight of these poor children. A complete ban should be imposed on child labour and rehabilitation institutes must be organised.

TAUSEEF KURD
Turbat

Updated Jun 23, 2013 09:53am

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Comments (2) (Closed)


aaa
Jun 23, 2013 09:01pm

Atleast they are happy without a degree. The ones with degrees are frustrated.

salam khan
Jun 23, 2013 11:33pm

I was watching a bbc documentary about working children in Rajasthan India, where these children attend evening classes especially designed for them by the local communities. This way, they do not remain uneducated and also are able to supplement their family income.