How cities embraced change

Updated May 17, 2013 02:16pm
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
Supporters of PTI chief Imran Khan shout slogans during a rally, May 6, 2012. — Photo by AFP/File
Supporters of PTI chief Imran Khan shout slogans during a rally, May 6, 2012. — Photo by AFP/File
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.
— Pie Charts by Ayesha Shahid and Abdullah Shahid.

To see references mentioned, please peruse slide show of pie charts above.

Tabdeeli aa gayee hai. This was Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf’s slogan in the run-up to the general election. Once the results poured in, it appeared as if the change had been limited to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. For the rest, there was no Naya Pakistan but a Purana Pakistan or a repaired one as some cynics put it.

But a quick look at some of the vote percentages for some of the major urban centres of Pakistan, the change is there. There is no other way to interpret the 2013 election results in Islamabad, Rawalpindi, Lahore, Karachi, Sialkot, Faisalabad, Multan, Sialkot and Quetta.

Predictably in Peshawar, the PTI is the biggest party in terms of vote share while in Quetta it has bagged the fourth position.

In the other seven, it has emerged as the second biggest party, displacing the Pakistan Peoples Party which enjoyed this slot in the 2008 polls. Even in a city such as Karachi, which does not welcome new parties easily, the PTI has displaced the PPP as the city’s second biggest party. This was surprising as for five years, the Awami National Party, the PPP and the Muttahida Quami Movement were involved in a bloody turf battle in Pakistan’s biggest city but at the end, a completely different party has quietly made space for itself.

But perhaps the PTI would not have been able to do this so successfully had it not been for the PPP which created a vacuum to begin with.

Indeed, in Punjab at least, it is obvious that the obliteration of the PML-Q and the rejection of the PPP has allowed the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz to increase its vote share and for the PTI to carve out a comfortable niche for itself.

This is especially evident in Faisalabad which in 2008 gave most of its votes to the PPP and where the PML-Q and the PML-N shared the second slot. But clearly, the electricity shortage, which affected the city’s economy, it is said, changed its voters’ mind. In 2013, over 60 per cent opted for the N, and 17 per cent for the PTI. The PPP and the PML-Q were reduced to 15 per cent in total.

In Quetta too, in 2008, the city was dominated by the PPP and the PML-Q. But this was only due to the boycott of the nationalist parties. Their return to the electoral fray in the province means that Quetta too has witnessed a change. Its voters have now opted for the Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party and the Balochistan National Party.

Peshawar, which has embraced the PTI wholeheartedly, however, has viciously rejected the PPP and the ANP.

In other words, the bigger cities of Pakistan have embraced change and a stark one at that. The pie charts say it all.

It needs to be stressed that the results of the major urban centres cannot be seen to be an accurate representation of the country-wide or even province-wise trends.


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Comments (11) Closed




Khan
May 17, 2013 02:35pm

Good analysis.

I understand this is a beta version so i'm hoping suggestions are welcomed. Could you please add a "pause" function to the slideshow and a "manual" option as well. I wanted to study the pie charts properly without having to click back ye woh. You get the point

Razi
May 17, 2013 03:26pm

Change Tabdeeli has come to villages rural area Karachi urban also but due to massive rigging that Tabdeli has not come out as in results. But PML MQM knows that PTI has won.

Hg
May 17, 2013 08:14pm

The population in the rural areas will take some convincing of PTI merits, it seems. God willing, PTI will make a great success of governing KP province, show the rest of Pakistan what they are missing and in the next election cycle should see them claim national victory.

GoodDeedsLeadTo
May 17, 2013 09:02pm

Comparing Imran Khan's crowds with NS's, it is evident the seat difference should not been, what came out as a result of polling. IK's crowds & rally's used to be bigger & energetic & passionate. The result of the election seem to be totally one sided. How is it possible, NS would win places like Faisalabad & Gujranwala & other cities with seriously bad economies, bad business, electricity reduced times, & fewer jobs would bring back NS? Election results do not make any sense at all, compared with reality on the ground.

Sab Se Pehle Pakistan
May 17, 2013 11:45pm

PTI is exposed throughout the country. They talk about so called change. They have proven it by appointing a CM in KPK who has changed multiple parties and have corruption charges on him.

I heard when Mr Khattak joined PTI. PTI workers had internal fights. Now they have him as Chief Minister KPK. Way to go Imran Khan. Good luck PTI workers.

Good that PTI is exposed now.

I am glad I voted for MQM as this is the only party who has challenged the system and brought change in its real sense. An ideal example of this is Mustafa Kamal a youngster made Nazim of one of the world's largest city Karachi and look what he has done. Rated among world's best Mayors. it is not a joke. It is a big achievement for the country

Now this is what I call youth and change. Hats off to Altaf Husein and his vision

Kashan Khan
May 18, 2013 12:08am

Never easy to make use of voting statistics and draw conclusions from the elections result when it is abundantly clear that too much irregularities took place in these elections.One of the most controversial elections in the country with grave repercussions for the future.

ali ahmed
May 18, 2013 12:24am

@Razi: photograph shows that they are ex voter of PML-N ,JI and PPI

Riaz
May 18, 2013 04:43am

Did these voters vote for Imran Khan or PTI?????

ashfaq
May 18, 2013 06:33am

@Sab Se Pehle Pakistan: Your kind believe in extortion and murder. Your kind has no place in any civilised society.

amir
May 18, 2013 05:55pm

@Riaz: In Peoples Party's case did people voted for hutto or PPP? It has been always one person who influences the change.

GoodDeedsLeadTo
May 19, 2013 10:02am

Noon did not fix the electricity issue in Faisalabad, though the province was in a position to do it after the amendment, and still got 60 percent vote, it does not make sense.