An Indian Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India travel to the shrine for the annual festival, marking the death anniversary of Sufi Muslim saint, Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. — AP Photo
An Indian Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India travel to the shrine for the annual festival, marking the death anniversary of Sufi Muslim saint, Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. — AP Photo
Indian Muslim Sufi devotees offer prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
Indian Muslim Sufi devotees offer prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
An Indian Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
An Indian Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
A Sufi pilgrim drinks tea near a Sufi shrine as pilgrims’ transit through the city on their way to the annual Urs in Ajmer, in New Delhi. — AFP Photo
A Sufi pilgrim drinks tea near a Sufi shrine as pilgrims’ transit through the city on their way to the annual Urs in Ajmer, in New Delhi. — AFP Photo
Flower petals are thrown in the air during a procession at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India travel to the shrine for the annual festival, marking the death anniversary of Sufi Muslim saint Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. — AP Photo
Flower petals are thrown in the air during a procession at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India travel to the shrine for the annual festival, marking the death anniversary of Sufi Muslim saint Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. — AP Photo
A family of Indian Muslim Sufis offer prayers for a family member, foreground, who they believe is possessed by evil spirits, at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
A family of Indian Muslim Sufis offer prayers for a family member, foreground, who they believe is possessed by evil spirits, at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
Sufi holy man participates in a procession at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
Sufi holy man participates in a procession at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers beside the Shahjahani gate at the entrance of the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo
Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers beside the Shahjahani gate at the entrance of the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. — AP Photo

Muslim Sufi devotee offers prayers at the shrine of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti during the Urs festival in Ajmer, India. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India travel to the shrine for the annual festival, marking the death anniversary of Sufi Muslim saint, Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti. — Photos by Agencies

Updated May 16, 2013 06:53pm

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Comments (5) (Closed)


Gopal Patel
May 18, 2013 07:58am
How you know that the person is a Muslim? There are millions of other faith devotees who come to Ajmer to seek Baba's blessings.
Muhammad Farooq
May 18, 2013 06:48am
He was a great humanist and a great saint. His kindness and generosity did not distinguish people on the basis of caste, color or creed. There is an acute need to spread his message within Pakistan and outside Pakistan.
Anwar
May 17, 2013 07:42am
Is it necessary to say Indian Muslim? Please come out of this obsession of referring others.
Ahmed Mustafa
May 17, 2013 05:49am
I respect the scholars, auliyah, waliullah. But I need not anyone to be between my prayers and the One Listener.
Hulegu
May 17, 2013 12:28pm
Thanks Dawn. But why do you have to refer to people as 'Indian Muslims'? The different view of a person's religion only exists in Pakistan. In India, everyone is Indian!